doodlebug

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doodlebug

[′düd·əl‚bəg]
(geology)
Also known as douser.
Any unscientific device or apparatus, such as a divining rod, used to locate subsurface water, minerals, gas, or oil.
A scientific instrument used for locating minerals.
(invertebrate zoology)
The larva of an ant lion.
(mechanical engineering)
A small tractor.
A motor-driven railcar used for maintenance and repair work.
(mining engineering)
The treatment plant or washing unit of a dredge which is mounted on a pontoon and can be floated in an excavation dug by a dragline.
(ordnance)
A small military tank or utility truck.
An airborne, magnetic submarine-detecting device.
References in periodicals archive ?
A German V1 rocket, known as a Doodlebug by the British
Gregg also wrote Maybe It's Because I'm A Londoner after being inspired by the German doodlebugs flying over the capital at the end of the war.
During his time in London, he worked, slept and ate underground, emerging only when he knew the German doodlebugs were not going to threaten.
Hitler's deadly V-1 and V-2 missiles, known as the doodlebugs, that landed in London in the summer of 1944 were the biggest threat to Britain claiming thousands of lives.
Pflock notes that the difference between Newton and Gebauer's con and many others that preceded it was they said their doodlebugs were better because they were based on alien technology.
There were doodlebugs coming down and you just didn't know where they were going to land.
These were factory-made kits and should not be confused with homemade Model A doodlebugs.
AN article in Issue 75 on doodlebugs over Teesside brought back memories for T Bell, who emigrated in 1948 to Australia.
When Hitler launched Doodlebugs against our cities, Spencer DFC met the rockets in mid-air, rendering them harmless with a clip from his wings - thus winning the nickname "Tip it in Terry".
Christina Rex has just published Doodlebugs, Gas Masks and Gum: Children's Voices from the Second World War.
When the doodlebugs started falling over the city, our family told us we needed to get out of London.
It accounted for the destruction of many enemy aircraft and in the latter part of WW2 this included 181 VI Doodlebugs in the south of England.