dopamine hypothesis


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dopamine hypothesis

[′dōp·ə‚mēn hī‚päth·ə·səs]
(medicine)
A theory that explains the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other psychotic states as due to excesses in dopamine activity in various brain areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia proposes that overactivity of mesolimbic DA neurons cause the positive symptoms, where underactivity of mesocortical DA neurons cause the negative, cognitive, and affective symptoms of schizophrenia.
Compared to the previous versions of the dopamine hypothesis, the sociodevelopmental-cognitive model suggests that dopamine dysfunction accounts not only for delusions but also for hallucinations and negative symptoms, such as apathy and a motivation.
The dopamine hypothesis of drug addiction and its potential therapeutic value.
As a cause of schizophrenia, 3 hypotheses are advocated: dopamine hypothesis, glutamate hypothesis, and neurodevelopmental disorder hypothesis.
It was around the time of this recognized failure that the one researcher made the first formal articulation of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (Rossum, 1966).
Madras, "History of the discovery of the antipsychotic dopamine D2 receptor: a basis for the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia," Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, vol.
Seeman, "Dopamine receptors and the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia," Synapse, vol.
Neuropharmacology of second-generation antipsychotic drugs: a validity of the serotonin - dopamine hypothesis. Prog Brain Res.
The dopamine hypothesis of drug addiction: Hypodopaminergic state.
Etiologic subtypes of attentiondeficit/ hyperactivity disorder: brain imaging, molecular genetic and environmental factors and the dopamine hypothesis. Neuropsychol Rev 17(1):39-59.