dormant bud

dormant bud

[′dȯr·mənt ′bəd]
(botany)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The portion of the shoot that is formed during the previous season and overwinters in the dormant bud is known as the preformed portion of the shoot; the portion of the shoot that forms during the current growing season is known as the neoformed portion of the shoot (Sabatier and Barthélémy 2001).
Immediately after pruning, the following treatments were sprayed to 'drip point' at dormant bud stage using a hand driven sprayer: garlic extract (GE) at 0, 14, 28, 42, 56 e 70mL [L.sup.-1]; calcium cyanamide (CaC[N.sub.2]) at 200g [L.sup.-1] and hydrogen cyanamide ([H.sub.2]C[N.sub.2]) at 25g [L.sup.-1].
In shortening a branch or twig, cut it back to an existing branch that you've determined is appropriate, or back to a lateral bud or dormant bud (dormant buds are at the base of all leaves).
Most species will break successfully from old wood, the pruning cut made just above a dormant bud near the top of the annual growth.
For example wherever possible you should cut back to either a bud or a dormant bud with the cut at an angle sloping up towards it which will help to stimulate new growth by directing the spring rush of sap into the right place.
* Cut on a diagonal, so that sap drips away from dormant bud.
Always cut to a dormant bud (one that's flattened against the stem) in an older stem, rather than to a swelling bud in a fresh stem.
Cook (1991) Comparison of "Cabernet Sauvignon" and "Cabernet franc" grapevine dormant bud cold hardiness.
The incision made on the based of the vine trunk is similar to that of the "chip-bud" method; however, in this case, both the top and the bottom incisions are like that done for the bottom of the "chip-bud." A dormant bud is then inserted, laterally like a piece of a puzzle, so that both angles above and below the bud will fit flush into the vine trunk.
In New Zealand, the proportion of dormant buds that sprouted in the spring usually does not exceed 50%, and may be up to 30% (MCPHERSON et al., 1994).