dot-com bubble


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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the dot-com bubble burst in 2000, Kevin led the firm through the crisis to achieve bold, solid and debt-free growth through 2012.
"For many investors, the mere thought of investing in technology makes the hairs on the back of their necks stand on end, after the bursting of the dot-com bubble at the end of the 1990s," he says.
In the heady days of the 2000 dot-com bubble, only 28 percent had ever sold anything.
Take the example of Pets.com, one of the many examples of a high profile public failure during the dot-com bubble in the early 2000s.
The latest losing streak is its longest for eight years when markets were rocked by recession fears after the dot-com bubble burst.
Naomi Smith, R&D manager at CIMA, said: "The past 20 years have seen corporate scandals, the dot-com bubble and the sub-prime debt crisis and these have shifted the role of management accountants from reporting and controlling through planning and analysis, to proactive performance management It is our hope that this research will highlight best practice and lessons that can be learned by companies in improving performance management"
So during the years of the dot-com bubble, the United States had both a massive increase in the value of equities issued and an increasing larger share of those offerings in the form of IPOs (Ofek and Richardson 2000).
Cisco has never had it so bad since 2001 in the aftermath of the dot-com bubble burst.
Not unlike the prior dot-com bubble, everyone "wanted in" without fully understanding the inherent risk in their investment.
He worked with TheDial.com, Digonex Technologies, Humanizing Technologies, DiscGo, SwapMo.com and then Sagebit to "fix the broken bodies that the dot-com bubble created." He also learned that "he who controls distribution controls everything."
This is the steepest one-off raise in a share sale taking place after the dot-com bubble burst in 2000.
Rahim Budhwani was working as a senior programmer at a high-end software company when the dot-com bubble burst and he realized he needed to diversify his career.