dot-com

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dot-com

(1) A commercial Internet domain name that uses the dot-com (.com) suffix at the end of the address; for example, www.computerlanguage.com is the domain name of the publisher of this encyclopedia. Since dot-com domains were used by all major corporations, the Internet became known as the "dot-com" world. See Internet domain name, dot-com company, dot-com bubble, not-com and dot-con.

(2) The .com domain spelled out in an email address on a website to prevent a spambot from identifying it. For example, instead of "alex@computerlanguage.com," the address is written as "alex at computerlanguage dot com." See spambot.
References in periodicals archive ?
UK AND SPAIN-EMERGING HUBS The majority of business leaders in the UK remain skeptical about dot.coms emerging as a shaping force in the new economy.
The brave new world of dot.com workers - where the once promising prospect of stock-option riches from Internet start-ups - has faded into a grim reality of layoffs, bankruptcies and plummeting stock prices.
But the bare fact is that the surge in dot.com buying has simply failed to happen.
to the San Francisco airport and you come to another instructive dot.com billboard, this one saying: "Root of all evil....
McLaughlin was not sure at first how his real estate skill set would fit into the world of dot.coms and had planned to devote several months to studying opportunities.
With the proliferation of new dot.com and portal companies, and their unprecedented spending on advertising to establish brand and attract new customers, the industry has never been more competitive.
Like it or not, we're all aboard the dot.com express.
Evade the dot.coms. Although the dot.coms have the benefit of speed and novelty, the advantages of infrastructure, brand and relationships lie largely with established businesses.
Venture capital was widely available, but unfortunately in too few sectors, which meant that many well-funded dot.coms fought for the same relatively-restricted customer base,' he said.
Peter Meehan, head of KPMG's Information, Communication & Entertainment practice in Birmingham, said accounting information was vital as financial markets had been taking a tougher view of dot.coms recently.
Reverting to "old economy" practices, more traditional executive pay packages will return, as opposed to the dot.com tendency to take compensation in huge stock options.
'Dot.coms are rewriting the rules, but are also realising that certain old economy business laws still apply.