double entendre


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double entendre

1. a word, phrase, etc., that can be interpreted in two ways, esp one having one meaning that is indelicate
2. the type of humour that depends upon such ambiguity
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References in periodicals archive ?
In a double entendre about her passion for horses, Princess Anne tells herbrotherthatshehasheard that "Camilla rides very well".
FAST-talking king of the double entendre, chef Ainsley Harriott, loves to spice up cooking in his own special way - by making it sound as saucy as possible.
And it's really nothing but double entendre after double entendre.
The Tory leader and colleague Alan Duncan are said to have collapsed with "schoolboy giggles" when a senior army chief made an unfortunate double entendre.
But unlike the old one this Rawhide Kid camps it up by dropping in the odd double entendre. In a bubble in the first edition of the series, called Rawhide Kid: Slap Leather, he says about the Lone Ranger: "I think that mask and the powder blue outfit are fantastic.
IS Boy George protesting about the rapper's attitude to gay men or is there a subtle double entendre here?
HERE'S a real double entendre - two Graham Nortons for the price of one.
Helen didn't get the hint so, undettered, Paul tried twice more using a saucy double entendre approach.
Roly-poly Uncle Phill loves a double entendre, and so does Captain Pugwash, or was that first mate Seaman Stains?
Denise Van Outen eggs them on, never using a double entendre where a single one will do ("Watching this game, I've just realised that there's a lot of CRACK in this place!"), while co-host Julian Clary tries, with varying degrees of success, to bring an air of wry detachment to the grotesque goings-on.
He was also strangely prudish, bearing in mind that much of Morecambe and Wise's act revolved around double entendre. I sat opposite Ernie at a TV Festival dinner for stars and journalists.
YOU may have noticed I'm a big fan of the double entendre and innuendo.