double hermeneutic


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double hermeneutic

(GIDDENS, 1984) the assumption that understanding in sociology and social science involves an understanding of social ACTION at two levels:
  1. the understanding of the ‘meaningful social world as constituted by lay actors’;
  2. the ‘metalanguages invented by sociologists and social scientists to understand and explain social action’. See also HERMENEUTICS, ETHNOMETHODOLOGY, VERSTEHEN.
References in periodicals archive ?
This brings into the discussion the topic of the double hermeneutic: that is, how researchers interpret the interpretations of those who have experienced the internationalisation process (see e.g., Giddens 1984; Noorderhaven et al.
He begins by describing how to rethink theory and practice and works through Bourdieu's theory as a way to liberate humans from symbolic violence, Gidden's double hermeneutic and the problem of language game change, the failure of Habermas's hermeneutic reconstructionism, and Rorty's critique of the will to power, among other topics.
Thus, the triumph of the M-Form, far from exonerating a predictive model of modernist social science (as claimed by the authors), looks more like a classic case of the double hermeneutic: Harvard-trained professors helped produce the success of the M-Form (through their influence on corporate executives) that their theories predicted.
Meditation on the early Greek thinkers, for Heidegger as well as for contemporary scholarship, includes a double hermeneutic task: to extricate their insights and texts (fragments, doxographies) from the "foreign (often Platonic and Aristotelian) contexts in which they are embedded" (p.
The empirical consequences of the "double hermeneutic." Social Epistemology 183-192.
`For instance, it is a logical feature of social research, following from the double hermeneutic, that all research endeavours have an ethnographic or "anthropological" aspect to them.
The framework for Rose's arguments is the notion of a "double hermeneutic" (the terminology comes from Ricoeur via Jameson, who significantly modifies the concepts).