heel

(redirected from down-at-heel)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.
Related to down-at-heel: dug in their heels, dig in his heels

heel

1
1. the back part of the human foot from the instep to the lower part of the ankle
2. the corresponding part in other vertebrates
3. Horticulture the small part of the parent plant that remains attached to a young shoot cut for propagation and that ensures more successful rooting
4. Nautical
a. the bottom of a mast
b. the after end of a ship's keel
5. the back part of a golf club head where it bends to join the shaft
6. Rugby possession of the ball as obtained from a scrum (esp in the phrase get the heel)

heel

2
inclined position from the vertical

Heel

The lower end of an upright member, especially one resting on a support.

What does it mean when you dream about a heel?

The heel is often used synonymously for the foot as a symbol, for example, to represent violence or oppression (e.g., under the heel of a dictator). As the part of the body most often in contact with the ground and dirt, it can be a symbol of the base or ignoble, for instance, a low, vile, contemptible, despicable person (a “heel”). The heel is also often represented by the analogous part of a shoe, which is frequently in shabby condition (“down at the heels”), perhaps signifying something in the dreamer’s life that needs attention. Finally, the heel can also represent vulnerability, as in an Achilles’ heel.

heel

[hēl]
(mechanical engineering)
(metallurgy)
A quantity of molten metal remaining in the ladle after pouring a metal cast-ing.
A quantity of metal retained in an induction furnace during a stand-by period.
(navigation)
Of a ship, to incline or to be inclined to one side.
(ordnance)
Upper corner of the butt of a rifle stock held in firing position.

heel

1. The lower end of an upright timber, esp. one resting on a support.
2. The lower end of the hanging stile of a door.
3. The floor brace for timbers that brace a wall.
4. The trailing edge of the blade of a bulldozer, or the like.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's a refreshing change when things go pear-shaped on the opposite side of the counter, and the down-at-heel shoes are on the other foot.
More that of a down-at-heel town somewhere in the developing world.
An imaginative scheme, with housing and retail, will help to transform a particularly down-at-heel part of Birmingham and provide fresh ammunition for the council to refute criticism that regeneration on the edges of the city centre has slowed to a snail's pace.
McDonald's UK sales have fallen for the past five years amid consumer backlash against obesity, the down-at-heel image of many of its outlets and negative perceptions about the quality of fast food.
If the once down-at-heel Birmingham can transform itself into such a vibrant and cosmopolitan city, why can't Coventry?
This down-at-heel chambermaid lived on a building site.
Thankfully, the producers of Friends don`t allow storylines to revolve around their special guests too much, so we'll also see a humbled Chandler accept a down-at-heel job at a shoe company and Ross face up to the person who mugged him as a child.
UNWANTED pets were fed to snakes at down-at-heel Glasgow Zoo, staff claimed last night.
For Kossoff, it has remained that dreary, down-at-heel, wind tossed place, its people existing on the pavement's edge, herded into the Underground, wetting their white skins in the chlorinated waters of a public pool, sitting bereft on a park bench, mortgage refused, their pet dog dead.
The vision is to redress the decline in Gateshead over recent decades which has resulted in poor modern development in an urban core that is generally regarded as down-at-heel.
In the midst of the great depression of the 1930s, people are disappearing from the shanty town in Central Park that thousands of down-at-heel New Yorkers call home.
DERELICT: Karen Williams in the down-at-heel entry behind her house