downburst


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downburst

downburst
A local high-velocity downward movement of air mass flowing out of a thunderstorm. It is the chief cause of severe wind shear. The size of a downburst may vary from a ¼ mile to more than 10 miles. It can last from 5 to 30 minutes. The wind speed can go as high as 120 knots. It is potentially very dangerous, especially during the takeoff and landing phases.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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A downburst is a strong downdraft resulting in a outward burst of damaging winds on or near the ground.
Furthermore, Mara and Hong [36] investigated the inelastic response of a self-supported transmission tower under different wind events, including traditional atmospheric boundary layer wind and downburst wind, and for wind loading at different directions relative to the tower.
The study finds that downbursts are dangerous to navigation.
[5] HABOOB: When a downburst slams into the ground, its winds can stir up a wall of dust in front of the storm.
As there was no visible funnel cloud, he said it was more likely a downburst than a small tornado - though he said it sounded like an un usually strong wind.
When the downburst of air reaches the ground, it blows the fine dust and sand into the air, creating a wall of sand, which has been known to reach 60 miles in width and several thousand feet in height.
Almost 20 years ago, a strong downburst from a storm moving across Orange County, N.Y., slammed into East Coldenham Elementary School, collapsing a cafeteria wall and killing nine children as they ate lunch.
Arctic Shatter combines cherry and peach flavors, while Dark Downburst is described as "a bold explosion of berry and citrus flavors."
Catastrophic storms, however, like the Flambeau downburst in 1977 (Dunn et al.
The trend appears to be a positive linear relationship, but if the point for the downburst in Wisconsin is considered an outlier, given its extreme intensity (253 km/hr), the graph could easily be viewed as unimodal.
In Showcase, the visitor will be able to explore downburst evolution near the ground through coupled model initiation, simulation, analysis, and display modules.
The JAWS data indicated that it took at least 5 to 6 minutes from the time the downburst reached the ground to the time when the winds of the outburst had reached their highest and most dangerous speeds.