downsizing

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downsizing

(jargon)
The process of moving an application program from a mainframe to a cheaper system, typically a client-server system.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

downsizing

(1) Converting mainframe and mini-based systems to client/server LANs.

(2) To reduce equipment and associated costs by switching to a less-expensive system.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Downsizing has been directly responsible for major layoffs in the business sector.
Although downsizing has attracted the attention of numerous researchers, the literature on this subject is relatively new, since the majority of existing studies were published in the early days after downsizing started to gain in popularity.
While few understood his prediction at the time, we now know that downsizing has been adopted as a management technique on a global scale (Macky, 2004).
A single definition of downsizing does not exist across studies and disciplines.
In another study, Armstrong-Stassen (1998a) used mail-in questionnaires to assess the individual characteristics and support resources that facilitated adaptation to downsizing among 82 managers in a Canadian federal government department over a 2-year period.
For the most part, this was not the participants' first experience with downsizing; 26 had at least one prior experience with downsizing.
We checked the robustness of our analyses by using alternative specifications of downsizing. Table 5 presents analyses of downsizings of 10 percent or more.
There is less evidence that population downsizing reduced institutional and social constraints on downsizings of 10 percent or more.
In addition to the downsizing and the impact it's had on engineering and construction companies, it's also had a similar impact on the technology suppliers and responsiveness, Traywick explained.
The Time 4 (T4) data were collected in early 1999 after completion of the downsizing.