downstage


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

downstage

The front part of a stage, nearest the audience.

downstage

From upper stages to downward or rearward. Air flows downward from a low-pressure compressor to a high-pressure compressor.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Fans and scholars of Brennan's fiction will be disconcerted to see the way in which Donoghue takes creative license to insinuate a connection between the upstage action of the short stories and the downstage action depicting Brennan's career and marriage.
25) Access/egress is possible downstage through the audience via a flight of steps at the center of the thrust and at the corners via diagonal ramps, and upstage via exits to either side and through whatever opening(s) may be built into structures across the proscenium opening.
Their function was not entirely clear though, as mentioned above, the narrow strip of stage downstage of the ponds provided a tiny walkway across which Beatrice stepped, half tightrope walker, half ballet dancer, her graceful movement contrasting nicely with her scabrous invective.
The endoscopic technique also allows clinicians to downstage or upstage patients with high-grade dysplasia and/or intramucosal carcinoma, and thereby determine who requires additional treatment, Dr.
With violins, cellos, and string instruments downstage, the wind instruments were in center stage at a small height while the percussion instruments dominated the upstage.
ANGELA MORETON adds: When Irving came to enact the death scene in Alfred Tennyson's Becket--produced at the Lyceum in 1893--he was always careful to fall forwards, his head downstage.
A ridiculous-looking tree with dangling tiles sits distractingly downstage.
At one point a buff male performer landed downstage, his face mere feet from mine in the front row, and winked, banishing all previous memories of Barnum and Bailey for good.
The endpoint of these studies (one in Verona, Italy and one in Munich, Germany) was to downstage rectal cancer so that it could be successfully surgically removed.
In her dressing room during the brief opening credits, she laughs, and, after her indelible silhouette punctuates ruby backlighting--"Ladies and gentlemen, Liza Minnelli"--she whirls into motion, cruises downstage, tosses her white fedora to the wings, stows her snow-fur boa with some lucky dresser in the pit, and giggles into the mic.
Downstage Upfront: The First 40 Years of New Zealand's Longest-Running Professional Theatre.