downturn

(redirected from downturns)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.
Related to downturns: Market Downturns

downturn

a drop or reduction in the success of a business or economy
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"For an aggressive investor downturns can create good buying opportunities," Shaheen said.
The results indicate that rural coal families may do better than others in dealing with the stress of an economic downturn. "Coal families in rural areas have significant experience with the boom-bust cycle," says lead author Michael Betz.
The findings show the "heightened importance" of drinking as a risk factor for suicide among men during economic downturns, according to the researchers.
On aver age, output regained half of its pre-recession high in seven months during the early downturns; it took only slightly longer--nine months--in the later downturns.
Downturns also have a habit of "culling the herd." This creates further opportunities for the survivors.
Since the start of Aug 2011, the stock's beta has returned to close to 1.0, which can partly be explained by equities' tendency to be closely correlated to each other in market downturns. Looking forward, we expect Rostelecom's beta to decline further as its defensive characteristics become more apparent.
What is ironic but very natural, are executives, in downturns act like human beings normally do.
"What business has to do is seize the downturn opportunities and gear up for the upturn.
pounds Keeping people in work is really important and it was not always seen that way in previous downturns."
One business benefit resulting from a deep economic downturn is the thinning of the herd of underperforming and poorly managed business enterprises.
They've weathered past recessions and are maintaining their success through the current downturn, as well.
This statement addresses three key points: (1) the state and local government sector's long-term fiscal challenges; (2) rapidly rising health care costs which drive the sector's long-term fiscal difficulties, and (3) the considerations involved in targeting supplemental funds to states through the Medicaid program during economic downturns. To provide Congress and the public with a broader perspective on our nation's fiscal outlook, GAO previously developed a fiscal model of the state and local sector.