vertical mobility

(redirected from downward mobility)
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Related to downward mobility: horizontal mobility

vertical mobility

movement up or down a status hierarchy or other hierarchy in a system of SOCIAL STRATIFICATION. see also SOCIAL MOBILITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
More generally, these examples of underemployment and downward mobility show the varied factors and continual pressures within labour markets and economy underlying the bigger picture on social mobility.
The downward mobility experienced by contemporary youth is not simply economic, given that the life pathways of youth are also shifting in ways that might reflect the relaxation of social norms and changes in normative benchmarks in the transition from youth to adulthood.
The downward mobility of today's younger Americans leads to the downward mobility of tomorrow's older Americans, making the problem of growing generational inequality truly dire.
This finding has resonance for Indigenous Australians, but avoiding the risk of downward mobility related to unemployment is not just a matter of Indigenous people choosing to live elsewhere.
those that presented downward mobility (12,14,16), regardless of the measurement of social mobility used (schooling, income, or occupational classification).
She added: "It is not that there has been an increase in the risk of downward mobility but rather an increase in the numbers 'at risk', or the proportion of children starting off in professional and managerial families.
The downward mobility index is the ex-ante probability that children achieve equal or lower educational attainment as their parents.
Downward mobility is a real threat, while upward mobility is limited.
In the US, upward mobility is more myth than reality, whereas downward mobility and vulnerability is a widely shared experience," he writes.
With young adults suffering downward mobility, are these young guns serious about adding burdens of supporting aging parents as well as raising young children?
Moreover, many of the jobs created during "the recovery" have been at the lower end of the wage scale, thus millions of re-employed workers have experienced downward mobility.
People are generally slow to acknowledge downward mobility.