downzoning


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downzoning

The change in the zoning classification of a property from a zoning classification of higher use to one that is lower; for example, from commercial use to residential use.
References in periodicals archive ?
building moratoria, for example, or downzonings, community benefits
The combination of seriatim decisionmaking and these political "taxes" generates the dynamics of the politics of downzoning. If the tax is a fixed cost, it will not deter big projects with large profit margins from moving forward.
However strange, the downzoning of prime residential land without considering its effect on the housing supply is not anomalous.
(133.) "Downzoning" means to reclassify an area or property into a lower, and typically more restrictive, zoning band.
Between 1971 and 2001, a total of 285 downzonings (decreases in bulk and densities permitted) were applied to residences in the north lakefront community areas, but only twelve were applied to residences in the south lakefront community areas.
No one who lost land value by downzoning benefited by reduced taxes as a result of the law change.
In that event, the financial effect of a downzoning could be overstated if it is measured with respect to the theoretical maximum density and not the density actually achievable on the property.
1999) (refusing to apply heightened scrutiny to downzoning); Rogers Mach.
In 1985, residents banded together to fight for downzoning after a Craftsman bungalow was torn down to make way for an apartment building.
Indirect Takings - Downzoning and Preservation Areas
On Saturday morning, the steering committee continued its substantive discussions with the topic of comprehensive land use, including the following sub-topics: (1) downzoning; (2) Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA); (3) takings; and (4) shoreline development.