drag factor


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drag factor

[′drag ‚fak·tər]
(chemical engineering)
Ratio of hindered diffusion rate to unhindered rate through a swollen dialysis membrane. Also known as Faxen drag factor; hindrance factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
These publications say, ice may have a drag factor as low as .
When the drag factor is lessened, the bullet retains more of its velocity/energy for a flatter trajectory and more terminal (on target) energy.
Sterling, which on a tradeweighted basis is now at its strongest level since 2008, is increasingly being viewed by manufacturers as a big drag factor, according to surveys.
The campaign has been livelier, freed from the drag factor the tiny "Yes" vote in the devolution referendum had on our politics for years afterwards.
Supermarkets are plastered with the red cross, flags come free with beer and baked beans and in "supporters packs" while average car speed is down by just over 10mph because of the drag factor of the compulsory two window flags flapping in the breeze.
But whatever you think of its looks, its unique shape gives the A2 the lowest drag factor in its class.
Cork expects that the millennium drag factor will start to lessen by the fourth quarter of this year.
The car has adjustable suspension, a weight of 1,160kg, special brakes and wheels, sticky tyres and a lower drag factor.
The roof has a specially designed full-length curve and corners are rounded off to improve air flow, while the gap between the truck and trailer is minimised to reduce turbulence and skirts under the trailer to further minimise the drag factor.
The surge is absolutely amazing - and the drag factor on the old cheekbones make it nigh on impossible to prevent a manic grin erupting over your face.
They claim that leaving windows open and using roof racks and air conditioning eat into fuel economy by disturbing the airflow and increasing the car's drag factor.