dread

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dread

Slang a Rastafarian
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
I opened my door carefully; and even then, as it turned on its hinges, it seemed to me to make a dreadful noise.
"And here its consequences may well be argued to be dreadful; for what can be more so, than to incur the divine displeasure, by the breach of the divine commands; and that in an instance against which the highest vengeance is specifically denounced?
One is a dreadful little man who is always sitting over the fire, and talking about the colour of the sky.
The judge of the Prerogative Court might have fallen in love with her, to see her fold her little hands and hold them up, begging and praying me not to be dreadful any more.
'Just as it did now to you,' says she, dreadful and frightful'; that she thought she was in hell;
"Well, it is dreadful," said Eliza; "but, after all, he is your master, you know."
As I emerged from my unconsciousness--which could not, I think, have lasted more than a few minutes--I was aware of a most dreadful and penetrating smell.
"Our visitors never do such dreadful things," said Lucy, while her brother, in whose memory the boiled egg had already grown unsubstantial, exclaimed in irritable tones: "Just what I've been trying to convince Cousin Charlotte of, Lucy, for the last half hour."
Terrible is the battle of the kings; dreadful the look of their eyes.
Now this way and now that, with an obstinate patience that was dreadful to see, Sergeant Cuff tried the boot in the footsteps, and always found it pointing the same way--straight TO the rocks.
- A little better; but under dreadful apprehensions of sickness.
The thought that he might, and very probably would, die that night occurred to him, but did not seem particularly unpleasant or dreadful. It did not seem particularly unpleasant, because his whole life had been not a continual holiday, but on the contrary an unceasing round of toil of which he was beginning to feel weary.