drill feed

drill feed

[′dril ‚fēd]
(mechanical engineering)
The mechanism by which the drill bit is fed into the borehole during drilling.
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References in periodicals archive ?
After an 18-month hiatus, NASA's Curiosity resumed drilling and sampling rocks in May using a new technique known as percussive drilling, which allows Curiosity to keep its drill feed permanently extended.
According to a (https://gizmodo.com/nasa-s-curiosity-rover-is-able-to-drill-holes-into-rock-1826271498) Gizmodo  report, first electrical issues plagued the drill's hammering mechanism and then the vehicle's drill feed malfunctioned in December that year.
Excessive rotational speed or drill feed will cause the cutting forces acting upon the drill to be greater than they should be.
When rotated at a high speed and pressed with high axial force into sheet metal or thin walled tube, generated heat softens the metal and lets the drill feed forward, produce a hole, and form a bushing from the displaced material.
In drilling, this problem can be caused by using the wrong type of drill or a dull or incorrectly sharpened drill, or by an excessively light or slow drill feed, among other factors.
Accurate drilling is a combination of minimised in-hole deflection and careful alignment of the drill feed as dictated by pre-planned blast patterns.
The hydraulic system for operating drill feed is self-contained and includes an oil reservoir.
Difficulties were experienced in holding the vehicle steady at the ice face and controlling the drill feed thrust.
Coming standard with the latest versions of autodrill and auto level, AutoMine facilitates consistent control of parameters, improving results and reducing wear on drill feed and rotation systems.
To improve visibility from the operator station, the drill feed has been mounted sideways on the boom.
The rigs are equipped with Sandvik's RD314 high-frequency rock drill, while their telescopic drill feed offers versatility for development, bolting or short-hole production drilling.
Changing from AISI/SAE low carbon mild steel at 20,000 psi tensile to stainless in the 70,000 to 120,000 psi range, alloy steels such as 4130 with 70,000 to 200,000 psi, or titanium alloys with 130,000 to 190,000 psi tensile, drill feed thrust increases almost directly by this tensile difference.