drill press

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drill press

[′dril ‚pres]
(mechanical engineering)
A drilling machine in which a vertical drill moves into the work, which is stationary.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drill press

A drilling machine mounted in a stand; a handle is used to lower the drill (which rotates about a vertical axis) into the work.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Designed for small diameter threads from #0 to 3/8", new button dies from Landis Threading Systems are well suited for Brown & Sharpe, Swiss and similar automatics and most live spindles as well as lathes and drill presses. The button dies are recommended for materials up to 24 Hrc and are available in two sizes--one with a 1" body diameter and the other with l 5/8" diameter.
Described below are these and other types of drill presses such as sensitive and radial drills.
Speeds and feeds are dialed in by the machine operator and are the same as for other drill presses. Drilling is either hand or power feed.
This type of drilling can be done on drill presses by using special attachments.
Other common features of bench-top drill presses include: five speeds (ranging from around 600 to 3,000 rpm), tilting tables for drilling at angles, and chucks that will accept bit shanks up to 1/2 in.
A variety of machines, from high speed CNC machines with rigid tapping to reversible drill presses, can use the tapping chucks and tap adapters designed for their needs.
Other popular uses include workholding applications on mills, machining centers, drill presses and surface grinders where the chuck can be bolted directly to the table.
Add into that mix Clausing drill presses and Kalamazoo saws, manufactured by Clausing itself, as well as surface grinders, and you have an idea of the breadth of the company's product reach.
Founded in 1911 as the GT Eames Co, a producer of arbor presses for the fledgling automotive as well as other industries, it became in 1919 the Atlas Press Co, expanding its product lines through the Depression years and WWII to include by 1950 drill presses and lathes for metalworking and lathes, milling machines, shapers, planer-jointers, belt and disc sanders, jig saws, and tilting arbor saws for woodworking applications.
Its most recent acquisition in 1994 of the Kalamazoo Saw business doubled its manufacturing capacity at its Kalamazoo plant for saws and drill presses. Its drill presses continue to be a standard for the industry, available in 20[inches] and 15[inches] drills with a choice of high or low speed drive, hand or power feeds, and electrical specifications for multiple drill production applications.