drilling mud


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drilling mud

[′dril·iŋ ‚məd]
(materials)
A suspension of finely divided heavy material, such as bentonite and barite, pumped through the drill pipe during rotary drilling to seal off porous zones and flush out chippings, and to lubricate and cool the bit. Also known as drilling fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comprehensively, considering all kinds of performance requirements for the slurry in expansive soil, the following key points of slurry formula designs are put forward according to the requirements for the drilling mud in expansive formation and the pipe jacking slurry in general formation:
In drilling mud, the spread speed of the ultrasound is larger than 1500 m/s, which is significantly larger than the speed of drilling mud (usually <2 m/s).
During UBD, the flow of formation gas into wellbore causes the reduction of the density of drilling mud at outlet.
When it comes to where drilling mud goes, what happens at a jobsite is just as critical as disposal.
The money from disposal of the drilling mud offsets the cost of the recycling program, which has always been a losing proposition.
Mud cleaners are similar to shale shakers in appearance and are used for removing sand from drilling mud (Fig.
(2008) shows that, carbon black nano particles in drilling mud produced a more continues and integrated mud cake, therefore less filtrate and mud cake thickness.
The pipe is caked in drilling mud, forced to the surface by the gas leak on Sunday, March 25.
The new vessels will provide supplies such as fuel, water, equipment, drilling mud and other materials, to offshore installations.
It covers health concerns in the towns of Dish and Flower Mound, as well as broader concerns about what's causing odors associated with drilling; the impact of hydraulic fracturing on water supplies and quality; the importance of a good cement job in constructing a well; the growing practice of "landfarming," which involves "spreading tons of drilling mud and other toxic waste" over the land; and the economic impact of drilling, including the risks of becoming a "mono-economy." The Record-Chronicle has also posted a number of relevant documents online, embedded in the stories.
Beaudo said the "trailing brownish material" was residual drilling mud pumped into the well in earlier operations.
Further drilling through the Abiod reservoir section has revealed the presence of pinpoint dull yellow fluorescence and oil stains in the (water based) drilling mud showing bright yellow fluorescence.