driving force


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

driving force

[′drīv·iŋ ‚fȯrs]
(chemistry)
In a chemical reaction, the formation of products such as an insoluble compound, a gas, a nonelectrolyte, or a weak electrolyte that enable the reaction to go to completion as a metathesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The control system that synchronizes the state of the engine and the transmission is necessary to control the required driving force and the fuel economy of the vehicle.
Advective driving force can be divided into large-scale advective driving force and local-scale advective driving force.
The move will see the company hiring up to 30 recruitment consultants and administrative staff during 2012 - tripling the size of the Driving Force workforce from 15 to 45.
"With the FAs, it is our intention to become a driving force behind football supporting the senior and grass roots game across the whole of the UK."
DRIVING FORCE: Jason Lyons "It was a nice win personally but it was also a nice win for Birmingham as a club.
Summary: Maronite Patriarch Nasrallah Butros Sfeir on Wednesday voiced support for "new blood" in Parliament, throwing his weight behind Lebanon's youth movements as a driving force for the country.
BARRY HAYLES has been the driving force behind many of Plymouth's good results in 2007, and his suspension this afternoon will hit Argyle hard.
The Rev Tim Brooke, the former minister of St Francis of Assisi in Radford, once worked with the legendary Abbe Pierre, the driving force behind the international Emmaus charity.
Providing flexible solutions is the key driving force in building a successful real estate environment today.
THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA'S LEADERS believe that Web 2.0 technologies will be a driving force in the workplace of the future, so they're laying the foundation for teaching those skills to students.