THC

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Related to dronabinol: Marinol

THC

(organic chemistry)
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Barry Wall, prescribed dronabinol in May 2012 for the treatment of Mr.
2015) revealed moderate quality proofs in favor of nabiximols, nabilone, dronabinol, or THC/CBD in treating spasticity from multiple sclerosis.
The researchers write that side effects associated with dronabinol treatment, including somnolence, were reported in most patients, while long-term effects on sleep quality measures, safety, and tolerability are unknown.
Marinol (dronabinol) is the prescription-only, FDA-approved product for the treatment of gastrointestinal issues related to AIDS or chemotherapy (Calhoun, Galloway, & Smith, 1998).
Service: comment counts: 4 or or 56 56 Dope on Prescription Dope on Prescription Fierce controversy about a new Concerns about a new medication medication in pain therapy in pain therapy Health experts of Germany's CDU Health experts of Germany's CDU and CSU parties spoke out and CSU parties are criticizing vehemently against the the planned simplifications in painkiller dronabinol, and the distribution of the moved to act against the painkiller dronabinol, and point planned simplification of its out the possibility of abuse.
According to the US National Library of Medicine, THC is a substance that can be extracted from marijuana, or synthesized, to produce dronabinol. This medication, which is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is often used to treat or prevent the effects associated with cancer treatment, including nausea and vomiting.
Efficacy of dronabinol as an adjuvant treatment for chronic pain patients on opioid therapy.
Among the other cannabinoids, the most studied ones are dronabinol (DBN) and nabilone, followed by cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), which seems to possess some anti-inflammatory, analgesic (Hohmann & Suplita, 2006; Rea, Roche & Finn, 2007; Jhaveri et al, 2008), anti-schemic (Lamontagne et al, 2006), antipsychotic (Leweke, Koethe & Gerth, 2005), ansiolitic (Crippa et al, 2011), and anti-epileptic effects (Mortati, Dworetzky & Devinsky, 2007); and finally, cannabigerol (CBG) and cannabicromeno (CBC) (Barceloux, 2012), which possess some properties which have been studied mainly in preclinical or animal models.
As regards the medicinal use of cannabis, a few medicinal products have been legalised; dronabinol and nabilone (USA) are indicated for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and AIDS-related anorexia and weight loss; nabiximols (Canada) is indicated for cancer-related pain and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis; and rimonabant (Europe) for reducing appetite in obesity.
Oral and blood THC concentrations were also poorly correlated following consumption of smoked, vaporized, edibles or medically approved dronabinol. Among the examples given was a rise in THC blood concentrations simultaneously with a decline in THC oral fluid concentrations.
The various combinations of search terms cannabis, humans, vomiting, anti-emetic agent, dronabinol, nabilone, cannabinoid receptors, medicinal cannabis, legislation, laws, Australia, palliative care and health care providers aimed to capture the articles in relation to the medicinal use of cannabis as an anti-emetic agent.