dropout

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dropout

1. a student who fails to complete a school or college course
2. Rugby a drop kick taken by the defending team to restart play, as after a touchdown
3. Electronics a momentary loss of signal in a magnetic recording medium as a result of an imperfection in its magnetic coating

dropout

[′dräp‚au̇t]
(computer science)
The accidental disappearance of a valid bit, digit, or character from a storage medium or during reading from or writing to a storage device.
(electricity)
Of a relay, the maximum current, voltage, power, or such, at which it will release from its energized position.
(electronics)
A reduction in output signal level during reproduction of recorded data, sufficient to cause a processing error.
(graphic arts)
A halftone negative, print, or plate on which some of the original image has been removed by masking or opaquing.

dropout

(1) On magnetic media, a bit that has lost its strength due to a surface defect or recording malfunction. If the bit is in an audio or video file, it might be detected by the error correction circuitry and either corrected or not, but if not, it is often not noticed by the human ear or eye.

(2) In data transmission, a momentary loss of signal that is due to system malfunction or excessive noise.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 million people in prison in America, and 70 percent of them are high school dropouts.
The thing is that districts deal with dropouts too, and so you would think that charter schools would be able to stack up against traditional districts when it comes to dropout rates," he said.
Strong, who is retiring, and one of the questions finalists have faced is how they would reduce the number of dropouts.
Redrawing the dire high school graduation picture painted just a few months ago, Los Angeles Unified officials announced this week that the district's dropout rate fell sharply in 2007-08 to about 26 percent.
For the first time, students will be counted as dropouts if they don't earn GEDs, pass TAKS, or if they never go to class in a district where they claimed to have transferred.
However, 56% of all dropouts (including 61% of female dropouts) blamed problems that fell under three other broad categories: personal, work-related, or "other.
Young women have made more progress than males and the dropout rate among students living in rural and small towns remains higher than in urban areas.
The percentage of students who were event dropouts decreased from 1972 through 1987.
Whatever the causes, high-school dropouts represent an enormous loss of human potential.
Nichols and Berliner find many instances across the country where, in response to these pressures, administrators have encouraged low-performing students to drop out and then failed to report these dropouts to state officials.
Unable to meet the minimum requirement for advanced education or entry into the workforce, dropouts experience higher unemployment rates and lower earnings than other workers (Coley, 1995; Sherraden, 1986; USDOE, 1999).
Just more than two-thirds of young white dropouts were in the labor force, either working or looking for work, as were about 70 percent of Hispanic dropouts.