dry air

dry air

[¦drī ′er]
(meteorology)
Air that contains no water vapor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dry air

Air that contains no water vapor. It weighs .07651 lb/ft3 in a standard atmosphere.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in classic literature ?
The hills sweated the ghi and sugar suet off his bones; the dry air, taken sobbingly at the head of cruel passes, firmed and built out his upper ribs; and the tilted levels put new hard muscles into calf and thigh.
National Committee for Disaster Management spokesman Keo Vy said cool weather generally brings dry air, which requires the preparation of water for personal consumption, as well as for rice plantation irrigation in the dry-season.
In winter, when they come in contact with cold dry air and various kinds of viruses, they trigger asthma seizures.
'With these developments, the northeast wind flow is expected to further intensify and become dominant over most parts of the country, bringing cold and dry air,' Pagasa said.
The Kuwaiti Meteorological Department mentioned earlier today that the current bad weather in Kuwait was affected by the extensions and depth of the Indian Oceans seasonal low, accompanied by hot and dry air masses.
The oxygen contents of KD-S SiC fibres after annealing under simulated atmosphere and in dry air, respectively, were presented in Figure 2(a).
After increasing the number of eggs loaded in one container from two to eight, microbial reduction efficacy declined around 2 log cycles, with a treatment time of 10 minutes using dry air.
This job would need hot, dry air to remove the water.
Scientists have shown that dry air helps the virus to survive longer, whilst simultaneously increasing its ability to spread from one person to the next.