dry farming

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Related to dry farm: Dryland farming

dry farming,

farming system adopted in areas having an annual rainfall of approximately 15 to 20 in. (38.1–50.8 cm)—with much of the rainfall in the spring and early summer—where irrigation is impractical. Seeding rates are used that correspond to the soil water supply; management practices that minimize water loss and soil erosion are also utilized. The land is often summer-fallowed (not used for crops) in alternate years to conserve moisture. Dry-land crops must be either drought-resistant or drought-evasive, i.e., maturing in late spring or fall; special varieties of crops such as wheat, barley, corn, sorghum, and rye are often used.

dry farming

[¦dri ′färm·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Production of crops in regions having sparse rainfall without the use of irrigation by employing cultivation techniques that conserve soil moisture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asked why he had made the change, Wolff said that he was convinced that it would improve wine quality after tasting wines from old vine, dry farmed vineyards.
The wine that took top honors at the famed Paris tasting of 1976 and helped put Napa Valley on the world's wine map, Warren Winiarski's 1973 Stag's Leap Wine Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon, was dry farmed, Winiarski confirmed to Wines & Vines.
The vines are dry farmed on volcanic soils and were planted on their own rootstock in 1972.
The May rains were an enormous boost to dry farms, which could see greater grain harvests than usual.
In addition to being certified organic, the home vineyard at Tres Sabores is also dry farmed, a popular topic during the conference.
LITTLE ORGANIC FARM Potatoes are dry farmed (grown without irrigation) for superior flavor.
Vines need deep roots (which they grow themselves) to express terroir; vines need to be dry farmed (with whatever rainfall happens to show up); vines have to be old (while you sit and wait), and so on.
He dry farms 20 acres of wine grapes on property his family has owned since 1917.
The vineyard has been organically certified and dry farmed for more than two decades; plantings now cover 12 acres, with small parcels of Cabernet Sauvignon, Petite Sirah and Petit Verdot added to the original Zin over the years.
Almost all Napa vineyards are either dry farmed or equipped with drip irrigation systems.
Williams: Frog's Leap dry farms all 250 acres, comprised of seven different ranches under our control.