dry

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dry

1. having little or no rainfall
2. not providing milk
3. (of a wine, cider, etc.) not sweet
4. Pathol not accompanied by or producing a mucous or watery discharge
5. Electronics (of a soldered electrical joint) imperfect because the solder has not adhered to the metal, thus reducing conductance
6. Brit informal a Conservative politician who is considered to be a hard-liner
7. the dry Austral informal the dry season
8. US and Canadian an informal word for prohibitionist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dry

[drī]
(science and technology)
Free from or deficient in moisture.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dry

i. When referring to aircraft hire charges, it means “without fuel,” as opposed to wet, with fuel.
ii. When referring to a power setting or output, it means without the use of an afterburner or water injection.
iii. In relation to a runway, it means a runway that is neither wet nor contaminated. This includes a paved runway that has been specially prepared with grooves or a porous pavement to retain effectively dry-braking even when moisture is present.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The next step is to design a flow optimized housing, which combines the effects of optimized particle flow with an electrically charged housing and pellets for measuring on-line dryly continuous coupler friction systems.
Referring to the Escorial in Spain, for example, Kubler dryly remarked how "[Father] Siguenza ...
'You don't know her, evidently,' Clark replies, dryly. The Iron Lady must be one of the few movers and shakers of the twentieth century with whom Lees-Milne, an architectural historian, did not share opinions, confidences or lunch.
A natural enough mistake, Iowa State Press publishing director Paul Becker insisted to The Ames Tribune: "I was struck by the remarkable similarity, between the two." As the Tribune dryly commented, "Both Conrad and Pulitzer are white men with beards."
It was smoothly, even glossily performed, not only by the dryly mischievous Lithgow and a delightful little boy from the School of American Ballet, P.J.
But we had to bring in the law." A Fairfax County police report, obtained by E&P, identified the dog as the "culprit" and declared, dryly, "The newspapers have been recovered unread."
As with Because Why, it is loaded with the kind of dryly funny moments of blank stares and awkward gestures Jarmusch and Kaurismaki favour.
"We find this argument more creative than persuasive," Buckley observed dryly, noting that Section 501(c))3) of the IRS Code governs religious organizations.
"People aren't flocking to the area on their own," Meyer notes dryly, "so we looked for some pragmatic help from people who knew the industry and the Reedsport area."
"The BBOA initially told us they would have to wait until after the court case before they could progress and they now say they have other pressing maters to deal with first," said Ritchie dryly.
They attacked the shelved-in limestone with their pick, And flecks rained dryly down on dead oak leaves.