Du Maurier


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Du Maurier

1. Dame Daphne. 1907--89, English novelist; author of Rebecca (1938) and My Cousin Rachel (1951)
2. her grandfather, George Louis Palmella Busson . 1834--96, English novelist, caricaturist, and illustrator; author of Peter Ibbetson (1891) and Trilby (1894)
3. his son, Sir Gerald (Hubert Edward). 1873--1934, British actor-manager: father of Daphne Du Maurier
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the box office success of du Maurier's creation was seized upon by the Edwardian advertisement industry.
Reading du Maurier's story in the early twenty-first century, many decades after it was first published, allows us the luxury of interpreting it retrospectively, whereby we can see it as an expression of the times in which it was written.
Kneehigh Theatre is based in Cornwall, just a stone throw's from Daphne du Maurier's home.
In both tales, du Maurier uses the art or science of time-travel fiction to revisit, replay, haunt, and generally manage what the UK train network journey planner at Network Rail refuses: allow us to go back and somehow start our journey before the moment we inhabit, capturing a vision of the past, present, and future as circular, cyclical, simultaneously parallel rather than a linear experience, one in which "all time is eternally present" ("Burnt Norton").
Older readers may be motivated to read Du Maurier's classic.--Hilary Crew.
This reading of Rebecca as a romance has been revised and rejected by certain feminist critics, who point out that du Maurier is using the unreliable narrator technique; therefore, "Rebecca is only 'romance' if the reader confines him--or herself--to the narrator's viewpoint" (Watson 2005: 39), the narrator being the second Mrs de Winter herself.
It was published in book form in 1865 and this is a facsimile of that edition, complete with the original illustrations by George du Maurier which have been omitted in all editions of the novel after that date.
The Birds is based on Daphne du Maurier's short story--which is also the inspiration for the famous Alfred Hitchcock film.
London, Feb 21 (ANI): A lost 'macabre' short story written by celebrated novelist, Daphne du Maurier, has been found by an enthusiast after more than 70 years.
After setting the stage for how Bronte's heroine occupies households with their own version of Bluebeard, she examines how other novelists have interpreted this theme (e.g., Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, 1938; Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories, 1979).
Jamaica Inn, perched high on isolated Bodmin Moor, was a notorious centre for smuggling in the 18th and 19th Centuries and subsequently became the focus for Daphne Du Maurier's top-selling book and the famous film of the same name.
Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier, was the favourite from the South.