dual-career marriage

dual-career marriage

the situation in which in contemporary industrial societies both partners in a relationship seek to maintain occupational CAREERS. Given the tensions between career and domestic commitments, especially on women (see DOMESTIC LABOUR), and also changes in the labour market (see FLEXIBLE LABOUR MARKETS), such arrangements are less common than is sometimes assumed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact of dual-career marriage on role conflict and marital satisfaction (M.S.
Ah examination of dual-career marriage, family, and career stress expectations of undergraduate students at Michigan State University.
Pat Schroeder." The text offers general readers, particularly dual-career couples, observations about how men interact with women, particularly successful women; the challenges to success in a dual-career marriage; and how men might handle the situation when their wives' professional achievements exceed their own.
Variables differentiating university women considering role-sharing and conventional dual-career marriage. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 50, 308-322.
Finally, the compromises of the dual-career marriage are disproportionately made by female scientists, who are more likely than their male counterparts to be married to an employed professional and who are likely to be younger and less established than their spouses.
Tales of balancing family demands in a dual-career marriage (to another academic working at the same institution) are interwoven with reflections upon the complex roles he assumes with doctoral advisees.
The individual described in the case example faces issues of sexual harassment in the workplace as well as challenges related to being part of a dual-career marriage. The author suggests career counseling strategies and discusses potential barriers to effective counseling.
In addition, there has been research focusing on spousal support in dual-career marriages (Perrone & Worthington, 2001); however, single-income couples appear to have been neglected in the research as well as a comparison of spousal support between marital-types.
A study of 82 commuters and 39 noncommuters in dual-career marriages found that traveling employees in commuter marriages have higher levels of "affective" organizational commitment--the desire to be identified with an organization--than those residing with their families.
Variables differentiating university women considering role sharing and conventional dual-career marriages. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 50, 308-322.
The finding is based on a survey of 52 men and 55 women in dual-career marriages looking at factors influencing marital quality.