Dummy

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dummy

1. Bridge
a. the hand exposed on the table by the declarer's partner and played by the declarer
b. the declarer's partner
2. a feigned pass or move in a sport such as football or rugby
3. (of a card game) played with one hand exposed or unplayed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dummy

 

(in publishing), a preliminary layout of a book or magazine made up in a publishing house for determining the precise distribution of text and figures. A test copy of a book or its binding made in the printing house before the printing of the entire run is also called a dummy. The planned distribution of material in columns or pages, which is compiled before the pages of a newspaper are made up, is often called a dummy.


Dummy

 

a form in the shape of the human figure made from various materials, such as papier-mache or wood, used for displaying or fitting clothing (in stores or tailor shops).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dummy

[′dəm·ē]
(communications)
Telegraphy network simulating a customer's loop for adjusting a telegraph repeater; the dummy side of the repeater is that toward the customer.
(computer science)
An artificial address, instruction, or other unit of information inserted in a digital computer solely to fulfill prescribed conditions (such as word length or block length) without affecting operations.
(engineering)
Simulating device with no operating features, as a dummy heat coil.
(graphic arts)
A preliminary layout which shows the placement of illustrations and text as they will appear in the final printing.
(metallurgy)
A cathode that undergoes electroplating at low current densities.
(ordnance)
ord
A nonexplosive bomb, projectile, or the like, or an object made to appear as one of these.
An object made to appear as an airplane, gun emplacement, or the like from the air.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The children who donate their dummies are then given a certificate to congratulate them on being a big boy or girl."
"We see children up to five or six years old using dummies. But prolonged use of dummies causes all sorts of problems and speech difficulties.
Even those who have never resorted to one of the "Dummies" books will find the packaging familiar.
WeCutFoam will cut the cake dummies and ship it anywhere in the U.S., either as individual layers or as a whole set including multiple cake layers.
But these need to be dummies that can stand independently whilst their clothes are vacuumed by the caretaker!
These estimates accord better with the deductions from the Dummies.com contest, compared to a (http://www.engadget.com/2012/08/14/microsoft-surface-199/) report on Engadget, in August, which suggested the Surface RT would retail at $199 ([pounds sterling]125).
Siri For Dummies is now available in print and all e-book formats and can be purchased online and at US retailers.
EXPENSIVE STAND-IN: Crash-test Dummies cost anywhere from $125,000 to $400,000 and Last an average of 10 years.
Anyone caught selling the dummies or bottles could face a fine of up to pounds 20,000, they said.
Initially a product of IDG Books, the For Dummies imprint is now owned by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
The dummies seem to have different characters depending how they're captured - some friendly if a bit sozzled-looking, thoughtful, manic, screaming and rather worrying.