dwarf

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dwarf

1. an abnormally undersized person, esp one with a large head and short arms and legs
2. 
a. an animal or plant much below the average height for the species
b. (as modifier): a dwarf tree
3. (in folklore) a small ugly manlike creature, often possessing magical powers
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dwarf

short for dwarf star.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

What does it mean when you dream about a dwarf?

Dwarfs are small people, traditionally regarded as possessing magical qualities or powers of divination. This may thus be a highly fortuitous dream symbol. Alternatively, dwarfs can be negative symbols, representing some part of the dreamer’s psyche that is stunted or repressed.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

dwarf

[dwȯrf]
(biology)
Being an atypically small form or variety of something.
(medicine)
An abnormally small individual; especially one whose bodily proportions are altered.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Dwarf

(dreams)
At times people will see dwarfs, midgets, or very small people in their dreams. These images seem to represent, or allude to, the childlike creative powers of the unconscious. You can think of the dwarf as a “worker” in your unconscious. He could represent some childlike condition that has the potential and power to influence your life. Consider the details and the emotional tone in the dream and make an attempt to connect it to a situation in your daily life. The dwarf suggests possibilities for learning and brings to the conscious mind messages from the unconscious.
Bedside Dream Dictionary by Silvana Amar Copyright © 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The speaker in the poem begins by virulently attacking such arguments and counters them by referring to the "good knight Roland" and "young [Philip] Sydney" as brave examples of "crouching mortals [who] fight / Their desperate cause with death." The poem concludes with the speaker's scorning "philosophers that jibe, / Poets and satirists with venomed pen, / Cynics and priests and all the embittered tribe / That curse through dwarfish lips the sons of men." Similarly, "Sonnet" compares man to Cuchulain, the most famous hero of Celtic mythology, who stood firm against his enemies: [...] in such case we stand In this great darkened world afflicted sore.
The term is now applied to certain dwarfish races of Central Africa, unknown until late in the 19th century, and of Malaysia.
Similarly, "a motorcycle wreck" cost Smith "half a year in a State of Washington hospital and another six months on crutches." Although "the accident had occurred in 1952, his chunky, dwarfish legs, broken in five places and pitifully scarred, still pained him so severely that he had become an aspirin addict" (37).
Fimi (196) links the "addition of the Second and Third Ages" with Tolkien's "experimenting with the genre of the novel." The Dwarfish past in The Hobbit, in its intermediate thickness, its suggestive context, was the model for this additive experimentation.
But the biggest difference was that Simon Cowell was just a dwarfish yet charismatic record company executive who was trying desperately to sell soulless manufactured pop to the masses.
The hand belonged to a small, dwarfish man." Elsewhere Wojnarowicz writes of "losing [himself] in the language of.
We are next taken to Ayodhya in Act VI, where the ugly and dwarfish Nala, now known as Bahuka, is employed as king Rtuparna's driver.
Its current market capitalization is US $ 140 billion, a dwarfish 40% of its former self.
A recently found one-faced linga from Akbarpur (Mathura district) has a depiction of two bulky and dwarfish ganas at the base.
With disturbing consistency, blackface served as one commonplace mark of foolishness in the iconography of the so-called "natural" fool--in medieval and Renaissance English parlance, a butt, laughed at because he was mentally deficient (whether ignorant, dull-witted, or mad) and often physically different as well (for example, "hunchbacked," dwarfish, lame, deformed, ugly, or blackfaced).
To mark the replacement of the admittedly infelicitous name "Operation Infinite Justice" by "Operation Enduring Freedom," for instance, it published a cartoon showing a dwarfish Bush in conference with the chiefs of staff--thick-necked cigar-chomping brutes.
When Robert Parker (as the boy Arthur) takes Excalibur from the stone in what is admittedly a dwarfish mountain range he is in silhouette against orange light and the effect is stunning.