dye sublimation printer

(redirected from dye diffusion)

dye sublimation printer

A printer that produces continuous-tone images with excellent quality. Also called a "thermal dye printer," the print cartridge contains a cellophane ribbon with panels of dye the same size as the page to be printed. There are four panels for each print: one each of cyan, magenta and yellow (CMY) and a final clear coat that allows the print to be handled immediately without smudging. Special dye-receptive paper is used.

Because the same amount of ribbon is used no matter how much color is in the image, the cost of ribbon and paper is always the same per print. Consumables for dye sublimation printers generally cost more than for inkjet printers.

Heat Releases the Dyes
The paper and ribbon are passed together under the printhead for each color panel. The printhead contains thousands of heating elements that produce varying amounts of heat. The hotter the element, the more dye is released. By varying the temperature, shades of each color can be overlaid on top of each other. The dyes are transparent and blend into continuous-tone color.

The "sublimation" means that the dye turns into a gas without first turning into a liquid. See thermal wax transfer printer and printer.


Dye Sublimation Printing
The paper and ribbon are passed by the printhead. The ribbon is heated, and shaded dots of dye are transferred to the paper. The ribbon contains a panel of each color the same size as the page being printed.







Multiple-Passes
This Canon Selphy 4x6" photo printer prints one color at a time, and the paper is drawn back in for the next color. After the three ink panels are used, the clear coat is applied. Each set of four panels in the ribbon makes one print.


Multiple-Passes
This Canon Selphy 4x6" photo printer prints one color at a time, and the paper is drawn back in for the next color. After the three ink panels are used, the clear coat is applied. Each set of four panels in the ribbon makes one print.







One of the First
FARGO's FotoFUN! was one of the first low-cost dye sublimation printers on the market. It was introduced in 1995 at a breakthrough price of USD $595. (Image courtesy of FARGO Electronics, Inc.)







Professional Dye Sub Printers
These Mitsubishi CP9550 units at Rutherford Camera in Doylestown, Pennsylvania accept paper and ink rolls from 3.5" to 6" wide for printing 270 to 680 photos.
References in periodicals archive ?
In term of applications, textile leveling agent will help to reduce dye diffusion rate and to capture the stable aggregate.
This is referred to as nanoplasmonic peak shift, which plateaus upon saturation confirming dye diffusion to the lower Ti[O.sub.2] interface.
Kodak - hardly a stranger in photography - also guarantees long-lasting prints with Dye Diffusion Transfer Technology.
Zahn, "Pathways for dye diffusion in wool fibers," Textile Research Journal, vol.
The use of the urea facilitates the dye diffusion in the sample by holding moisture on fabric at high temperature.
DataCard Dual Sided Printer 300dpi - 40sec/card, Dual interface of high speed USB 2.0 & Ethernet, Security erase function for K panel, Dye diffusion UV printing, Extended modular options, Over-the-edge full color printing, Glossy photo finish...etc.
It is generally accepted that the dyeability enhancement upon heating is ought to the fabric swelling and, hence, better dye diffusion. In this context, the presence of amidoxime groups in the amidoximated acrylic fabrics as the active dye sites would facilitate dye uptake.
Plasma pretreated on wool fibers results in an increase of dye diffusion into the wool fiber which can reduce the dyeing temperature [14].
High quality hard copy of electronically stored images can be produced by thermal dye diffusion printing [1].
The diffusion of large molecules is less well documented, but is important in printing processes where a dye diffuses into a substrate, as in the case of the Dye Diffusion Thermal Transfer [D2T2] process (2-6).
The diffusion time ([T.sub.free]) of the free component was fixed at the measured [[tau].sub.d] of antibody alone (320 [micro]s, appropriate for the expected molecular weight of 140 kDa and an observation volume diameter [[omega].sub.x-y] of 265 nm, calculated from dye diffusion times).
Colour strength values of the wool fabric samples are higher as ultrasonic energy is an additional effect factor in deaggregation of the dye molecules and it enables a more rapid movement and effective blending, dye diffusion and a better dyeability when compared to the conventional method [20].