dysgerminoma


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dysgerminoma

[¦dis·jər·mə′nō·mə]
(medicine)
An ovarian tumor composed of large polygonal cells of germ-cell origin, resembling seminoma of the testis, but less malignant. Also known as embryoma of the ovary.
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KIT gene mutation and amplification in dysgerminoma of the ovary.
Both cases was diagnosed as Malignant mixed germ cell tumour of ovary with a histologic combination of immature teratoma; dysgerminoma and Yolk sac tumour.
(7) In the current case, dysgerminoma was diagnosed due to disproportionate enlargement of the abdomen because of ascitic fluid in the pregnant lady.
These findings are consistent with metastatic dysgerminoma.
Pregnancies complicated by dysgerminoma and Krukenberg tumour had favourable foetal outcome.
In germ cell tumours mature cystic teratoma is the commonest group, constitutes 90.9% followed by dysgerminoma 6% and mixed germ cell tumour 3%.
The differential diagnosis of ovarian clear cell carcinoma includes epithelial ovarian neoplasms (discussed above), dysgerminoma, yolk sac tumor, granulosa cell tumor, and steroid cell tumor (discussed below).
Of the 210 cases 27.6% were germ cell tumours, comprising of 24.76% mature cystic teratomas (2 cases of struma ovarii, 1 strumal carcinoid and 1 squamous cell carcinoma arising in mature cystic teratoma reported), one case of immature teratoma with gliomatosis peritonei, 4 cases of malignant dysgerminoma and one malignant mixed germ cell tumour (dysgerminoma+yolk sac component).
There were 7 cases of mature cystic teratoma, 2 cases of dysgerminoma, 3 cases of yolk sac tumor, 1 case of malignant teratoma and 1 case of epithelial tumor.
(11) Historically, this fact was exemplified in 1930 when Robert Meyer coined the term dysgerminoma as the characteristic tumor of the dysgenetic gonad.
And out of all malignant masses 65% were serous cystadenocarcinoma and 35% were dysgerminoma.
(27) According to this classification, germ cell neoplasms are divided roughly into 7 histologic categories: dysgerminoma, yolk sac tumor, embryonal carcinoma, polyembryoma, choriocarcinoma, teratoma, and gonadoblastoma.