dyskaryosis


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dyskaryosis

[di‚skar·ē′ō·səs]
(pathology)
Any abnormality of the nuclei of exfoliated cells, without significant change in cell integrity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the 2014 Bethesda system (9), we detect atypical epithelial cells dissimilar with other cells, but without dyskaryosis. These cells were contained within group in the ASC-US, and they are the most important because they can be followed by the development of malignant tumor cells (8, 9).
A 27-year-old female was referred with cytology showing high-grade changes (moderate dyskaryosis).
Rozendaal et al., "High-risk HPV testing in women with borderline and mild dyskaryosis: long-term follow-up data and clinical relevance," Journal of Pathology, vol.
We diagnosed benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with no evidence of malignancy because there were no findings suggesting prostate cancer such as nuclear enlargement and dyskaryosis in the epithelial cells.
With increasing signs of dysplasia, the dyskaryosis increased.
"If a smear test picks up small changes in the cells on the cervix, these abnormal changes - called dyskaryosis - act as an early warning signal that cervical cancer might develop.
Vaidya had showed that low socio economic status had a definite role in development of dyskaryosis. (11)
RHEIA-VAC is a Phase II study of the ProCervix therapeutic vaccine that is used for HPV 16 and/or 18 infected women, who have normal cervix cytology or ASCUS(1)/LSIL(2) (mild cervical cellular dyskaryosis).
There is an increase in the number of mitoses, and dyskaryosis, anisokaryosis, and dyschromatosis are present (figure 3).
Cervical dyskaryosis among women with and without HIV: prevalence and risk factors.
The rate of detection of endocervical cells appears to be a valid and convenient surrogate for the ability to detect dyskaryosis and for adequate smear rates.