dyslexia

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dyslexia

(dĭslĕk`sēə), in psychology, a developmental disability in reading or spelling, generally becoming evident in early schooling. To a dyslexic, letters and words may appear reversed, e.g., d seen as b or was seen as saw. Many dyslexics never learn to read or write effectively, although they tend to show above average intelligence in other areas. With the aid of computerized brain scans such as positron emission tomography (PET), recent studies have offered strong evidence that dyslexia is located in the brain. Damage to the brain can cause a reading disability similar to dyslexia, known as acquired dyslexia or alexia.

dyslexia

[dis′lek·sē·ə]
(medicine)
Impairment of the ability to read.

dyslexia

a developmental disorder which can cause learning difficulty in one or more of the areas of reading, writing, and numeracy
References in periodicals archive ?
Schott and Schott [31] and Schott [32] have observed that many dyslexics present with symptom of reversing of alphabets or mirror writing (for example, "?
October is National Dyslexia Awareness Month and it is hoped Dean's books will make reading fun for dyslexics.
He added: "Whilst we believe that it will be an invaluable tool for dyslexics, it will also give children and adults without the learning difficulty a greater understanding of the origins of our language, enabling them to grasp the true meanings behind parts of words and make greater sense of a language that we learn verbatim, but never question.
To investigate the two potential sources, Bart Boets and colleagues from the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium scanned the brains of 22 normal and 23 dyslexic adults.
The dyslexics showed less coordination between the 13 brain regions that process basic phonemes and a region of the brain called Broca's area, which is involved in higher-level language processing.
WORD UP Ellie started blue ribbon drive to help dyslexics
These studies describe the presence of greater difficulty in dyslexics to recover the phonological form of the words, in accordance with the model of Levelt and the presence of phonological deficiency in these persons.
Of course, not every dyslexic person faces all of these challenges, but most dyslexics deal with at least several of them.
A spokeswoman said: "For dyslexic learners who have maths on top of reading problems, it's a 'double whammy' that can even lead to school refusal.
The present study attempts to advance our knowledge on the possibility that dyslexia in university students is associated with preference to a specific sensory learning style or not and thus sensory learning preference may or not be a distinctive dimension between dyslexic and non-dyslexic condition.
Dr Kate Saunders of the British Dyslexia Association said: "A range of research demonstrates the way dyslexic individuals process auditory material is different to non-dyslexic learners.
Another area in which dyslexics have shown themselves to be different is learning style in that dyslexics are more visually and spatially oriented (Davis, 2006; Davis & Braun, 1997; Parkinson & Edwards, 1993; Silverman & Freed, 1991).