dysphasia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

dysphasia

[dis′fā·zhə]
(medicine)
Partial aphasia due to a brain lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the type of speech disorder, the majority of subjects (54%) had dyslalia, 25% had dysphasia, and stuttering was observed in 21%.
The specific symptoms included expressive dysphasia (2 patients); weakness of arm, leg, or both (3 patients); generalized drowsiness (1 patient); and confusion (1 patient).
And such is Daniel's growing reputation in the film world, Oscar-nominated Stephen Rea, himself a lover of the Irish language, took the starring role in his short film, the bi-lingual Fluent Dysphasia.
Chrissie also started going to The Stroke Association's Dysphasia Support Group in South Liverpool which aims to help those who have speech and communication difficulties.
Ted Little, a 74-year-old volunteer for the Birmingham branch of the Stroke Association, uses pedal-power to help raise much-needed cash for South Birmingham Dysphasia Stroke Group.
The onset of the disease is indolent, and the symptoms are generally related to severe thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and neurologic changes (including headache, confusion, paresis, and dysphasia); renal dysfunction (including hematuria, proteinuria, and azotemia); and fever However, involvement of the heart, pancreas, spleen, adrenal glands, and other organs is well described.
Chronically ill elderly subjects with severe mental impairment or with severe dysphasia were excluded.
Often residents with dysphasia speak in complete and appropriate sentences after a massage.
No stimulation-related side effects such as dysarthria, dysphasia, or motor contraction were observed.
Notably, there is only one previous case report of a cerebellum mass in a patient with OCD symptoms, which complicated automatic motor activity leading to dysphasia [5].
The patient often feels discomfort and dysphasia when the mass appears.