dysphonia


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dysphonia

[dis′fō·nē·ə]
(medicine)
An impairment of the voice.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An examination reveals somnolence, retractions, dysphonia, and cervical lymphadenopathy.
The voice of an individual with adductor spasmodic dysphonia is commonly described as strained or strangled and full of effort.
Some patients with spasmodic dysphonia may benefit from treatment by a speech-language pathologist.
Various studies regarding group voice therapy have been developed and present satisfactory results [10,17,18], which makes it a viable alternative for treating dysphonia.
In some instances of multinodular goiter with preoperative dysphonia, improvement of vocal dysfunction has been reported after excision of the goiter.
Another major concern of hypopharyngeal surgery is the patient's ability to tolerate the procedure due to pain, dysphonia, and/or dysphagia in the early postoperative period.
Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a voice disorder characterized by involuntary movements or spasms that prevent the normal vibrations of the vocal cords and the production of a normal voice (see Figure 1).
On original presentation, the patient's symptoms included fatigue, heliotrope erythema on the face, dysphonia, ulcerations on the thighs, and papules on the dorsal side of the fingers.
Respiratory studies, laryngeal physiology, linguistic demands, the three types of phonation occurring during fluent speech (modal, pulse and loft registers), laryngeal reflex mechanisms, histological studies of the structure of the vocal folds and their function, neuromuscular activity and management of dysphonia are examined.
The situation didn't improve, and she was eventually diagnosed by Berke with spasmodic dysphonia, the vocal equivalent of writers' cramp.
Paulson suffers from spasmodic dysphonia, which has left him speechless for more than 7 months.