dysplasia


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dysplasia

[di′splā·zhə]
(pathology)
Abnormal development or growth, especially of cells.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[USPRwire, Tue Aug 13 2019] Skeletal dysplasia is a heterogeneous group of more than 450 disorders.
In the UK most women with moderate dysplasia are advised to undergo surgery without delay, but this has a risk for the outcome of future pregnancies, including miscarriages and premature deliveries.
[ClickPress, Tue Jul 16 2019] By epidemiology, according to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia has a prevalence of 1 in 2500 to 1 in 5000 population.
pylori is an important triggering factor in inducing gastric cancer by a cascade of events, i.e., atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric dysplasia (GD).
Fibrous dysplasia is a slowly progressive, benign, rare and idiopathic skeletal disorder in which normal bone and marrow are replaced by fibrous tissue and randomly distributed woven bone, usually with pain, bony deformity and pathologic fractures.1 In 1938 had Lichtenstein first coined the term "fibrous dysplasia (FD)"2 Mutation in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein coding gene in early stages of life is responsible in the etiology of the disease.
The spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) is a type of skeletal dysplasia that mainly involves the spine and proximal epiphyseal centers1.
Elbow dysplasia and osteochondrosis collectively lead to the development of arthritis (osteoarthritis).
Hysterectomy is commonly requested by patients upon learning of cervical dysplasia, particularly if they have chronic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and have experienced years of frequent surveillance and interventions.
The main change between the 2017 and 2005 WHO classifications is the simplification into a 2-tier system from a 4-tier system by the unification into high-grade dysplasia of former moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ (CIS), (2,7) although the category of CIS from the amended Ljubljana classification was left as a footnote.