dysprosium


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dysprosium

(dĭsprō`zēəm) [Gr.,=hard to get at], metallic chemical element; symbol Dy; at. no. 66; at. wt. 162.500; m.p. 1,412°C;; b.p. 2,562°C;; sp. gr. 8.54 at 25°C;; valence+3. Dysprosium is a lustrous silvery metal; it is very soft and can be cut with a knife. It is in Group 3 of the periodic tableperiodic table,
chart of the elements arranged according to the periodic law discovered by Dmitri I. Mendeleev and revised by Henry G. J. Moseley. In the periodic table the elements are arranged in columns and rows according to increasing atomic number (see the table entitled
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 and is a member of the lanthanide serieslanthanide series,
a series of metallic elements, included in the rare-earth metals, in Group 3 of the periodic table. Members of the series are often called lanthanides, although lanthanum (atomic number 57) is not always considered a member of the series.
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; all members of this series are rare-earth metalsrare-earth metals,
in chemistry, group of metals including those of the lanthanide series and actinide series and usually yttrium, sometimes scandium and thorium, and rarely zirconium. Promethium, which is not found in nature, is not usually considered a rare-earth metal.
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 and resemble one another in their chemical properties. Dysprosium is stable in air at room temperature. It dissolves in both dilute and concentrated mineral acids; forms a white oxide known as dysprosia; and, with other elements, forms several brightly colored salts. It is commonly found with other rare-earth metals in several minerals, including gadolinite and euxenite. Dysprosium and its compounds are among the most highly susceptible to magnetization of all substances and are used in special magnetic alloys. A cermet of dysprosium oxide and nickel is used in nuclear reactor control rods. Dysprosium is used with argon in mercury-vapor lamps to give a higher light output and balance the color spectrum. Although dysprosium was discovered (but not isolated) in 1886 by P. E. Lecoq de Boisbaudran, a French chemist, it did not become available in relatively pure form until the 1950s.
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dysprosium

[dis′prō·zē·əm]
(chemistry)
A metallic rare-earth element, symbol Dy, atomic number 66, atomic weight 162.50.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dysprosium

a soft silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series: used in laser materials and as a neutron absorber in nuclear control rods. Symbol: Dy; atomic no.: 66; atomic wt.: 162.50; valency: 3; relative density: 8.551; melting pt.: 1412?C; boiling pt.: 2567?C
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Dysprosium ion might get introduced into the host of LiF matrix in its 3+ form ([Dy.sup.3+]) and this ion is a well known activator mostly showing its emission in the visible region.
earth elements (HREEs), such as, dysprosium, terbium, neodymium,
Japan plans to import 30 tonnes of dysprosium from Kazakhstan this year, the daily said, adding that it plans to raise the shipment next year to more than 50 tonnes accounting for 10 percent of Japan s annual demand for the mineral.
Kutessay was historically rich in HREEs (43.7% of TREO) such as yttrium (26.7%) and dysprosium (6.14% of TREO).
Another feature focuses on the efforts of Toronto-based Avalon Rare Metals to mine rare earth elements like samarium, praseodymium and dysprosium, which are found near Yellowknife in the Canadian North.
Demand for the magnets, made of such rare earths as neodymium and dysprosium, is expected to grow due to rising sales of hybrid and other eco-friendly cars.
Rare earth metals, such as lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, europium, terbium, dysprosium, and yttrium are essential materials used in state-of-the-art magnets, batteries, lighting-based phosphors, and for national defense applications.
If they ever live up to their promise, nanocomposite magnets should reduce the demand for both neodymium and for another rare earth element called dysprosium.
The rare earth sector covers companies with operations involving exploration, extraction, transport, processing or any other business involving any of the following 17 rare earth elements: Scandium, Yttrium, Lanthanum, Lutetium, Ytterbium, Thulium, Erbium, Holmium, Dysprosium, Terbium, Gadolinium, Europium, Samarium, Promethium, Neodymium, Praseodymium, and Cerium.
Soil assays for REE's include Samarium (Sm), were reported with grades of up to 218 ppm (g/t) and Dysprosium (Dy) with grades of up to 98.6 ppm (g/t), Neodymium (Nd) with grades of up to 1190 ppm (g/t), Ytterbium (Yb) with grades of up to 31.3 ppm (g/t) and Yttrium (Y) with grades of up to 472 ppm (g/t).
This strategy aims to overcome the 'rare-element crisis'that was triggered by increasing demand for such elements as lithium, used in batteries, and dysprosium for Ne-Fe-B permanent magnets.