dysprosium


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dysprosium

(dĭsprō`zēəm) [Gr.,=hard to get at], metallic chemical element; symbol Dy; at. no. 66; at. wt. 162.500; m.p. 1,412°C;; b.p. 2,562°C;; sp. gr. 8.54 at 25°C;; valence+3. Dysprosium is a lustrous silvery metal; it is very soft and can be cut with a knife. It is in Group 3 of the periodic tableperiodic table,
chart of the elements arranged according to the periodic law discovered by Dmitri I. Mendeleev and revised by Henry G. J. Moseley. In the periodic table the elements are arranged in columns and rows according to increasing atomic number (see the table entitled
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 and is a member of the lanthanide serieslanthanide series,
a series of metallic elements, included in the rare-earth metals, in Group 3 of the periodic table. Members of the series are often called lanthanides, although lanthanum (atomic number 57) is not always considered a member of the series.
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; all members of this series are rare-earth metalsrare-earth metals,
in chemistry, group of metals including those of the lanthanide series and actinide series and usually yttrium, sometimes scandium and thorium, and rarely zirconium. Promethium, which is not found in nature, is not usually considered a rare-earth metal.
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 and resemble one another in their chemical properties. Dysprosium is stable in air at room temperature. It dissolves in both dilute and concentrated mineral acids; forms a white oxide known as dysprosia; and, with other elements, forms several brightly colored salts. It is commonly found with other rare-earth metals in several minerals, including gadolinite and euxenite. Dysprosium and its compounds are among the most highly susceptible to magnetization of all substances and are used in special magnetic alloys. A cermet of dysprosium oxide and nickel is used in nuclear reactor control rods. Dysprosium is used with argon in mercury-vapor lamps to give a higher light output and balance the color spectrum. Although dysprosium was discovered (but not isolated) in 1886 by P. E. Lecoq de Boisbaudran, a French chemist, it did not become available in relatively pure form until the 1950s.

dysprosium

[dis′prō·zē·əm]
(chemistry)
A metallic rare-earth element, symbol Dy, atomic number 66, atomic weight 162.50.

dysprosium

a soft silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series: used in laser materials and as a neutron absorber in nuclear control rods. Symbol: Dy; atomic no.: 66; atomic wt.: 162.50; valency: 3; relative density: 8.551; melting pt.: 1412?C; boiling pt.: 2567?C
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the rare earths are lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, terbium, and dysprosium.
1 Development of Dysprosium Manufacturing Technology
gadolinium, dysprosium, and terbium are also used in numerous electrical
Working with the magnet company Intermetallics, materials scientist Satoshi Sugimoto of Tohoku University and colleagues recently developed fine-grained magnets that require 40 percent less dysprosium.
Neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, europium, and yttrium are valuable for end use in wind turbines, photovoltaics, and energy-efficient electric vehicles and fluorescent lighting.
Terbium and dysprosium can be additives to enhance the coercivity in NdFeB magnets.
Tiny quantities of dysprosium can make magnets in electric motors lighter by 90 per cent, while terbium--which is soft enough to cut with a knife--is a key component of low-energy light bulbs, which use 80 per cent less electricity than traditional incandescent globes.
Figure 8 shows neutron diffraction scans of the magnetic peaks in a film where 15 atomic planes of magnetic dysprosium are separated by 14 atomic planes of non-magnetic yttrium, and then this basic bilayer is repeated (43,45-46).
Interesting specimens of calcite, fluorite colored by dysprosium, chamosite, kainosite-(Y) and other minerals have been found in fresh roadcuts along New York State Route 30.
Contract Awarded for Concrete, mechanical and electrical installation as well as testing and commissioning of the pilot process plant that will produce dysprosium a heavy rare earth mineral.
To fuse the magnetizable atoms to the silica surface, the team developed a molecule with an atom of dysprosium (a rare earth metal with atomic number 66), where the molecule scaffolding acts as a "vehicle" for the atom.
The initial output product from the SuperLig-One pilot program will be critical heavy rare-earth elements (often referred to as H-CREO's) in the form of metal carbonates of dysprosium (Dy), terbium (Tb) and europium (Eu), scheduled for delivery in Q2 2016.