dysthymia

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dysthymia

[‚dis′thī·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Any childhood condition caused by malfunction of the thymus.
(psychology)
A mood disorder characterized by chronic depression for a period of at least 2 years. Also known as depressive neurosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
When I first introduced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) to Bill as a means of treating his dysthymic disorder along with medication, he rejected CBT as "psychobabble." However, I was able to implement several CBT strategies and techniques by using his religious language to describe them.
The dysthymic patients had greater use of supplemental Social Security disability income and higher receipt of Medicaid insurance, and were less likely to be working full time compared with the other groups, according to results that were published online (J.
Women with higher levels of psychological functioning (that is, little or no dysthymic features) are apt to feel positive about their pregnancy, value prenatal medical care, and use prenatal services, making intervention with depressed women an important thrust in social wo rk practice and research.
Subjects selected met the criteria for major depression or dysthymic disorder from DSM-IIIR.
The current psychological examination showed a dysthymic configuration with psychotic symptoms and obsessive-compulsive consistencies in a discordant context, accompanied by serious socio-familial adjustment difficulties.
A well-known example is the emergence of MDEs in dysthymic patients.
These names all connote presentations of depressed mood after an environmental stressor, without either the full constellation of symptoms that define major depression or the chronicity of dysthymic disorder.
The diagnoses of major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, and adjustment disorder with depressed mood were categorised into depressive disorders group.
It is my view that the depressive symptoms at the major, minor, dysthymic or subsyndromal levels are all integral components of the longitudinal clinical structure of major depressive disorder (MDD), with each symptom level representing a different phase of illness intensity, activity and severity.
Hellerstein and his colleagues treated 17 patients with Dysthymic disorder or major depression using antidepressants combined with 12 weeks of behavioral activation therapy adapted to specifically improve social function.
I have treated many patients with mild chronic depression or dysthymic conditions who have had excellent (family member validated) short- and long-term results with antidepressant medications--so many patients, in fact, that the responses do not seem to reflect a placebo effect.
Subjects with a major depressive episode but without melancholia or subjects with dysthymic disorder had levels comparable with controls.