dysthymic disorder


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dysthymic disorder

[dis¦thī·mik dis′ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
Mild chronic depression that often results in impairment of social functioning, family relations, and work performance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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L-Acetylcarnitine in dysthymic disorder in elderly patients: a double-blind, multicenter, controlled randomized study vs.
He reported being diagnosed with dysthymic disorder years ago; he came to counseling because this promotion is causing heightened stress, worry, fear, and feelings of depression.
Fifty-six per cent of the patients were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, most commonly major depression, dysthymic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and alcohol dependence (15,16).
recurrent MDD without full inter-episodic recovery, or a chronic major depressive episode, or 'double depression' (concurrent major depression and dysthymic disorder).
Early- versus late-onset dysthymic disorder: comparison in out-patients with superimposed major depressive episodes.
A growth curve analysis of the course of dysthymic disorder: the effects of chronic stress and moderation by adverse parent-child relationships and family history.
LAS VEGAS -- When it comes to the pharmacologic treatment of patients with dysthymic disorder, the best scientific evidence points to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as a first-line treatment, Dr.
Akiskal, who is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Affective Disorders, noted that dysthymic disorder shares many similarities to major depressive disorder.
LAS VEGAS - When it comes to the pharmacologic treatment of patients with dysthymic disorder, the best evidence points to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as a first-line treatment, according to Dr.
The comorbidity of major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder and anxiety disorders with migraine.
The steps that I will outline for successfully addressing religious differences developed from my clinical work with Bill (pseudo name), a 22-year-old offender who presented to therapy with dysthymic disorder. By no means are the guidelines offered meant to be seen as an all inclusive list, but rather are offered as a starting place for addressing religious differences.