cyberactivism

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cyberactivism

Using email, blogs and social networking sites to publicize a cause by disseminating information quickly that is unavailable through normal government and commercial news sources, which may or may not eventually catch up. Cyberactivism can help promote a cause, product, company, politician or a revolution; witness the extraordinary amount of cyberactivism in the Middle East after the turn of the century.

Known by Many Names
Cyberactivism is also called "Internet activism," "electronic advocacy," "e-campaigning," "e-activism" and "online organizing." See social networking site.
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It was pointed out that international organization MATZ group is a consortium providing cloud solutions in e-health, e-education-governance, e-activism, e-security and smart tech solutions through its consortium partners.
A decade later, "e-activism" -- a term that has been coined to speak of activists who resort to blogging and a host of other social media such as Facebook and Twitter -- has become a driving force in the Middle East.
For many internet activists, the birth of the e-activism trend in the region can be traced to countries such as Egypt and Tunisia, where e-activists mounted spectacularly successful campaigns before anyone else had.
According to 50-year-old blogger Gabriel Deek, who played a leading role in shaping the online campaign opposing the draft law by blogging on the issue, resorting to e-activism methods was instrumental in the Parliament's eventual decision to postpone it.
Lefkowitz, manager, e-activism at Oceana, and a close follower of blogs, wrote in an email.
OK, it does help when the Home Secretary is your Dad, but don't underestimate the power of e-activism.
Find more on E-activism and on the National Coalition Against Censorship report at www.advocate.com
And Web-based e-activism, like its flesh-world counterpart, ranges from the earnest and traditional to the humorous and radical.
It's common for activists to refer to the new globalized order as "McWorld." So, it's not surprising that one of the first big e-activism stories was McSpotlight [less than]http://www.mcspotlight.org/[greater than].
E-activism has a direct action side as well, employing more radical tactics that include such things as electronic civil disobedience (ECD).
Voluminous responses from virtual volunteers happen, in part, because e-activism is so easy.
FoE's Zdeb agrees that e-activism "is definitely a tradeoff." But, she says, "If you are able to generate a huge volume--even if they are all form letters--that can be pretty effective in getting people's attention."