e-mail appliance


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e-mail appliance

(1) A stand-alone mail server that plugs into the network to provide e-mail for an organization. Typically rack-mounted hardware, the device includes software that provides the message store and transfer agent (see mail server and messaging system). Users access their mail with a client program in their computers or via a Web browser. See server appliance and e-mail interfaces.

(2) A device specialized for accessing e-mail that was introduced around the turn of the century. Today's e-mail appliances are typically smartphones. See Internet appliance and Internet server appliance.


E-Mail Appliance
One of the first e-mail appliances, this seven-ounce, pocket-sized Postbox Express had a built-in analog modem that plugged into a standard telephone jack. (Image courtesy of VTech Holdings Ltd., www.vtech.com)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The iSX Web Server and eSX E-Mail Appliance are loaded into the flash/EEPROM memory of the processor.
The eSX E-Mail Appliance configuration combines a UART physical layer and the PPP, TCP/IP and ICMP network protocols with the SMTP (transmit) and POP3 (receive) application-layer e-mail protocols.
There are two choices to consider when looking at housing email in a dedicated environment: (1) a general-purpose Unix or Windows NT or (2) an e-mail appliance server environment to address e-mail scalability requirements as the company grows.
The second choice to consider is e-mail appliances designed from the ground up for e-mail sending and receiving (via SMTP) and storage and access (via POP and IMAP).
In addition, the offering provides 24/7 e-mail appliance and network management by a professional hosting team that guarantees availability service level agreements.
Hewlett-Packard Co has introduced the HP Digital Sender 8100C, its new network-enabled e-mail appliance for sending paper documents electronically, through a LAN or WAN, to an e-mail or fax location.
But push e-mail appliances have reduced the response times that people expect.
The rapidly expanding range of e-mail security threats is driving demand for e-mail appliances. These threats force companies to look beyond single- point anti-virus and firewall protections for better defenses at the network gateway.