income

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income

1. the amount of monetary or other returns, either earned or unearned, accruing over a given period of time
2. receipts; revenue
References in classic literature ?
He loved the guineas best, but he would not change the silver--the crowns and half-crowns that were his own earnings, begotten by his labour; he loved them all.
I suppose your father wanted your earnings," said old Mr.
And for this, at the end of the week, he would carry home three dollars to his family, being his pay at the rate of five cents per hour--just about his proper share of the total earnings of the million and three-quarters of children who are now engaged in earning their livings in the United States.
Even Jay Gould, carried beyond his usual caution by these stories, ran up to New Haven and bought its telephone company, only to find out later that its earnings were less than its expenses.
Yes, they're quarrelling over the division of the earnings of the street railways.
As my husband, he could take all my earnings if he chose.
At other times,--and then their scanty earnings were barely sufficient to furnish them with food, though of the coarsest sort,-- he would wander abroad from dawn of day until the twilight deepened into night.
I'd paid him truly every cent of my earnings,--and they all say I worked well.
They were coeval with the coureurs des bois, or rangers of the woods, already noticed, and, like them, in the intervals of their long, arduous, and laborious expeditions, were prone to pass their time in idleness and revelry about the trading posts or settlements; squandering their hard earnings in heedless conviviality, and rivaling their neighbors, the Indians, in indolent indulgence and an imprudent disregard of the morrow.
And thereupon he entered into a long technical and historical explanation of the earnings and dividends of Ward Valley from the day of its organization.
Economize as he would, the earnings from hack-work did not balance expenses.
The Barbary Coast of San Francisco, once the old-time sailor-town in the days when San Francisco was reckoned the toughest port of the Seven Seas, had evolved with the city until it depended for at least half of its earnings on the slumming parties that visited it and spent liberally.

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