eastern

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eastern

facing or moving towards the east
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It also served the function of emphasizing his status as an outsider and invoked expectations of backwardness that might absolve him of possible blame from a reader with an "eye of criticism or politics." This strategy resembles ones used by peasants, women, other minority nationalities, and others inside the Soviet Union considered as "backward." (58) However, the fact that Nazarkhan used his Easternness rather than his status as a "victim of colonial exploitation" or any other aspect of his identity to avert the "eye of criticism and politics" of Comintern and KUTV authorities testifies to the importance of "the East" as a marker of difference, and of the awareness of its importance among even the most novice students.
This melding could be cause for labeling Kerouac and others as possessing, in Trigilio's words, an "easy Easternness"; but Grace views it instead as evidence of Kerouac's intentional syncretism, and concludes that Kerouac's statement that he was most influenced by Mahayana Buddhism makes the most sense in light of his mystical, intuitive, and worldly leanings (149).
Portrayals of Muslim life in Clone exemplify the kinds of persistent, ill-informed, gendered and culturalized stereotypes that abound in contemporary media, particularly regarding westernness and easternness. Yet, the uses of Clone's contents by viewers in Kyrgyzstan reveals that global popular culture can provide tools for creative processes of alternative societal- and self-formation.
If his earliest works reflected a conscious turn away from Western influence, he later sought "Easternness" in Sino-Japanese techniques, for instance, which could suggest a movement in Indian identity toward pan-Asianism.
But it is possible that the easternness of the phantoms is linked to the curious mixture of the 'monstrous' and the 'familiar' which is signalled later on in this first stanza.
(40) Foley 2001: 210 also makes this point; see Morrell 154 on Easternness and femininity as related terms, 151-52, 155-57, and n.