ebulliometer


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ebulliometer

[ə‚bu̇·lē′äm·əd·ər]
(physical chemistry)
The instrument used for ebulliometry. Also known as ebullioscope.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Setup for the first ebulliometer measurement takes 15 to 20 minutes for a dry wine with less than 1% residual sugar.
There are two types of ebulliometer. The standard version that is heated with an alcohol burner has been manufactured for decades.
"Using an ebulliometer is inaccurate, and it takes a lot of time.
Among the tests he performs in-house are sugar hydrometer (Brix), pH, titratable acidity, volatile acidity via cash still and ebulliometer, residual sugar via Clinitest, free S[O.sub.2] and paper chromatography for malolactic analysis.
Currently, Sternfeld (with temporary lab techs during harvest season), performs routine wet chemistry analysis and fermentation monitoring in-house, including TA and pH measurements using a pH meter, VA via cash still, free S[O.sub.2] by the A/O method, alcohol via flame ebulliometer; malic acid, residual sugar, ammonia nitrogen and amino nitrogen via UV spectrophotomic analysis; dissolved C[O.sub.2] by carbodoseur and Brix and density measurements using an Anton-Paar densiometer.
A technique that is commonly used by wineries is the ebulliometer. This was first constructed by the chemist Groning in 1823 and functions according to the principle that hydro-alcoholic mixtures boil at temperatures between 78.3[degrees]C or 172.94[degrees]F (pure alcohol) and 100[degrees]C or 212[degrees]F (water).
Although this may provide more accurate results than in-house methods, such as the ebulliometer, the cost of these tests and the delays involved can prove prohibitive.
Though Vinquiry doesn't use electric ebulliometers, Bowen notes that customers sometimes bring them in for service.