eccentric orbit

eccentric orbit

[ek¦sen·trik ′ȯr·bət]
(astronomy)
An orbit of a celestial body that deviates markedly from a circle.
References in classic literature ?
An habitual liar's nearest approach to truth: the perigee of his eccentric orbit.
Howard, said that "the planet spends most of its time loitering in the outer part of its star's planetary system in this highly eccentric orbit, then it starts to accelerate in and does a slingshot around its star."
Brown said the asteroid's "eccentric orbit" and speed were also likely factors in what made spotting it ahead of time challenging.
Kalas and De Rosa now believe that both happened: The planet was kicked into an eccentric orbit when it came dangerously close to the central binary star, a scenario proposed in 2017 by theorist Laetitia Rodet and her collaborators from the Grenoble Observatory in France.
"This star was already known to host a planet, called Pi Mensae b, which is about 10 times the mass of Jupiter and follows a long and very eccentric orbit," said Chelsea Huang, a Juan Carlos Torres Fellow at the MIT Kavli Institute.
Outside of work, she is also a wind synth and keyboard player in the band Eccentric Orbit .
The eccentric orbit predicted for the planet means that it will spend most of its time near aphelion, its orbit's farthest point.
Akatsuki is just now beginning regular operations, and the highly eccentric orbit will provide an opportunity to track Venus' major features over long periods.
This planet is unusual in that it has a wildly eccentric orbit almost like that of a comet, swinging very close to its star and then back out to much greater distances over and over again every 111 days.
But it has an eccentric orbit that looks more like that of a comet than an asteroid and brings it well inside the orbit of Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun, every 1.4 years.
The probe itself was accelerated into an eccentric orbit approaching to within about 0.31AU of the Sun.
In the course of its eccentric orbit, the moon moves through the mean positions of the Earth-moon L1 position.