eccentric

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eccentric,

in mechanics, device for changing rotary to back-and-forth motion. A disk is mounted off center on a shaft. One flat, open, circular end of a rod fits around the edge of the disk; the other end is usually attached to a block that slides in a slot. As the shaft rotates the block slides back and forth, carrying along whatever is attached to it, e.g., a valve. The distance between the center of the shaft and the center of the disk is the eccentricity. The so-called throw may mean either the eccentricity or the distance the block moves, which is twice the eccentricity. Camscam,
mechanical device for converting a rotating motion into a reciprocating, or back-and-forth, motion, or for changing a simple motion into a complex one. A simple form of cam is a circular disk set eccentrically on a shaft in order to induce (when the shaft rotates) a rising
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 and crankscrank,
mechanical linkage consisting of a bar attached to a pivot at one of its ends in such a way that it is capable of rotating through a complete circle about the pivot.
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 perform the same function as the eccentric, which designers often prefer to the crank for short motions.
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Eccentric

Not having the same center or center line; departing or deviating from the conventional or established norm.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

Eccentric

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

In astronomy, eccentricity refers to an elliptical orbit, specifically to the extent to which the ellipse described by a celestial body’s orbit departs from a perfect circle, expressed by the ratio of the major to the minor axis.

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Eccentric

 

in astronomy, an auxiliary circle in the geocentric system of the world, introduced by Hipparchus to represent the annual revolution of the sun around the earth through motion along a circle with constant angular velocity. The nonuniformity of the sun’s motion along the ecliptic was attributed to the fact

Figure 1

that the sun moved (uniformly) along the circumference of an eccentric, whose center C did not coincide with the earth T (see Figure 1).


Eccentric

 

a circular disk whose axis of rotation does not coincide with its geometric center. In cam mechanisms, an eccentric, acting upon a rod that moves in a straight line, communicates to the rod a harmonic motion such that the displacement of the rod is proportional to the cosine (or sine) of the eccentric’s rotation angle. In linkage, an eccentric acts as a crank, that is, as a link that makes a complete revolution around its axis of rotation. Such an application of an eccentric is efficient when the crank (its throw equal to the eccentricity of an eccentric) must be very short. Eccentrics are also used in lathe attachments to clamp details that are being machined.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

eccentric

[ek′sen·trik]
(science and technology)
Situated to one side with reference to a center.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eccentric

eccentric head and shaft
Not having the same center or center line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eccentric

1. situated away from the centre or the axis
2. not having a common centre
3. a device for converting rotary motion to reciprocating motion
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
THE amount of Examiner coverage allocated to the eccentric Jake Mangle-Wurzel (pictured) is surely worth a whip round by the Examiner and its readers.
The exclusion of women eccentrics in these analyses is unfortunate, an omission that Schulman acknowledges.
137), we have found that the dividing line is not clear-cut, that is, between functional eccentrics and those who have a (history of) mental disorder.
But what is an English eccentric and why do they form such an important part of our identity?
He is hopeful that eccentrics will remain despite the increasing homogeneity of risk-averse modern Britain.
Not eccentric, but at least he broke from the norm.
ECCENTRIC DRESSERS Rosie Oddie (left) and Paloma Gormley, the daughters of ornithologist Bill Oddie and artist Anthony Gormley feature in the May edition of Harper's Bazaar magazine
With a truly British flourish of magnanimity, at first place, the most eccentric person is Bjork, the Icelandic singer and actress, whose name sounds like a stifled attempt not to burp.
Nevertheless Crackpots, Ratbags and Rebels is a most entertaining overview of some of Australia's most famous and not so famous eccentrics. Since Keith Dunstan's 1979 book Ratbags, no overview of Australian ratbaggery has been published, so in some ways such a study is overdue.
Some of the local eccentrics impress me More than any celebrity I've ever met and fascinate me so much that I resist getting to know them for fear I'll discover they aren't as happy as they appear."
HOW IS IT THAT A BRITISH DOCTOR fifty years dead, an oddball amateur who made advertisements and corporate training films, instructional works, and propaganda for the Orwellian-sounding Ministry of Information, is suddenly being discovered as one of the great eccentrics of film history?