ecclesiastic

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ecclesiastic

1. a clergyman or other person in holy orders
2. of or associated with the Christian Church or clergy
References in classic literature ?
Nothing could be more grossly absurd than the reproaches which the Abyssinian ecclesiastics aspersed us and our religion with.
He was driven on, and other carriages came whirling by in quick succession; the Minister, the State-Projector, the Farmer-General, the Doctor, the Lawyer, the Ecclesiastic, the Grand Opera, the Comedy, the whole Fancy Ball in a bright continuous flow, came whirling by.
Now, I have confessed to these learned ecclesiastics, and that in all humility, that the duties of mounting guard and the service of the king have caused me to neglect study a little.
About the entire person there was no evidence of a shirt, but a white cravat, of filthy appearance, was tied with extreme precision around the throat and the ends hanging down formally side by side gave (although I dare say unintentionally) the idea of an ecclesiastic. Indeed, many other points both in his appearance and demeanor might have very well sustained a conception of that nature.
Fortunately, I had a definite clew, for there was a particular picture in his sketch-book which showed him taking lunch with a certain ecclesiastic at Rosario.
The service, which was broadcast live on KTO Catholic TV, gathered less than 30 people - mostly ecclesiastics - in one of the small chapels in the cathedral that was least damaged by April's blaze.
It includes sculptures that populated church retablos, sacred vessels and altar embellishments, paintings of saints, ecclesiastics, and events in the lives of the heavenly host, furniture, ivory images of the elite, and simple images of humble homes.
One of the biblical observations highly respected by Christians can be found in Ecclesiastics Chapter 3, Verses 1 to 8, which summarily indicates that there is time for everything in this world.
The escalation of violence against the civil society, with physical assaults on ecclesiastics, journalists and human rights defenders, is unacceptable.
The ecclesiastics cannot be spared the evolutionary tendency of the cosmos.
In fact, the gambit portrayed in Trial by Fire is one of the gimmicks exposed in Letters on Natural Magic (1832), written by scientist David Brewster, who notes that monks and ecclesiastics likely saved themselves from the flames by applying special balms to their hands.
Three kinds of texts contributed to the diversification of Catholicism among the Nahuas and Mayas: those written and published by ecclesiastics for a Spanish and native readership, those written by ecclesiastics for natives but not published, and those composed by natives for natives and not published.