echelle spectrograph

echelle spectrograph

See echelle grating.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

echelle spectrograph

[e‚shel ′spek·trə‚graf]
(spectroscopy)
A spectrograph that employs gratings intended to be used in very high orders (greater than 10), and is equipped with a second dispersal element (another grating or a prism) at right angles to the first in order to separate the successive spectral strips from each other.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Fiber-fed high-resolution visible-light echelle spectrograph with radial velocity capabilities
The five-year data collection, made possible with an instrument called Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph installed on the IRTF, allowed researchers to study a full cycle of QQO, the first study to have done so.
Keck Observatory in Hawaii, using the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph instrument.
Tau Bootis b does not transit in front of its parent star from our viewpoint on Earth, but Lockwood and colleagues were able to tease out the weak light emitted by the planet using the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph (NIRSPEC) at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii.
[9] ESPRESSO, the Echelle SPectrograph for Rocky Exoplanet and Stable Spectroscopic Observations, is to be installed on the ESO Very Large Telescope.
The SpectraPro HRE high resolution echelle spectrograph is suited for use with the proprietary CCD and ICCD camera systems.
Installed on the ESP 3.6 m Telescope in Chile, HARPS - along with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, also in Chile - was used to confirm the existence of Proxima b.
Using data of tau Bootis b from the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph (NIRSPEC) at the W.
Once a student feels proficient in the basics, he or she can use a simulated telescope and photon-counting spectrometer (patterned after an echelle spectrograph on the Multiple Mirror Telescope) to take spectra of several stars, which can then be saved and compared.
As part of the study, the researchers used the large eight-meter Gemini North telescope in Hawaii and an instrument called the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES).