echelon

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echelon

Physics a type of diffraction grating used in spectroscopy consisting of a series of plates of equal thickness arranged stepwise with a constant offset

Echelon

 

(Russian, eshelon), in Soviet military usage:

(1) A unit within the battle or operational arrangement of a body of troops. A battle formation or the operational arrangement of a front’s or any army’s forces may consist of one echelon or of several echelons arranged one behind another.

(2) A distinct grouping of personnel being moved by rail, water, or air. In this sense, an echelon may be a troop train, a motor-vehicle convoy, or a group of aircraft or surface ships.

(3) In military strategy, the part of a country’s armed forces that is deployed while mobilization is taking place in a critical period, at the very outset of a war, or in the course of military actions.

echelon

[′esh·ə‚län]
(ordnance)
A formation of troops; the units are parallel but unaligned, in a steplike manner.
A similar arrangement of planes or ships, as planes flying in a V formation.

echelon

echelon
i. An arrangement of aircraft flying a formation in which each flies at a level above or below another aircraft in the formation and usually at a distance to the right or the left. Aircraft are said to be in the echelon port or the star-board, depending on which side of the leader they are on.
ii. A level of maintenance service, such as first echelon maintenance, fourth echelon maintenance, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To ensure the development of a truly seamless solution for the tactical echelons, the BAA and BAB joint configuration control boards are converging into one board to ensure interoperability between the command post and the platform.
As Bamford writes, the idea behind Echelon was that "agencies would be able to submit targets to one another's listening posts and, likewise, everyone would be allowed to share in the take--to dip their electronic ladles into the vast cauldron of intercepts and select what they liked."