echo chamber

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echo chamber

a room with walls that reflect sound. It is used to make acoustic measurements and as a source of reverberant sound to be mixed with direct sound for recording or broadcasting

echo chamber

[′ek·ō ‚chām·bər]
(acoustics)
A reverberant room or enclosure used in a studio to add echo effects to sounds for radio or television programs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The development of these echo chambers reinforces the perspectives and opinions that a person has already established and limits exposure to a diversity of opinions (Colleoni et al., 2014).
Couple this with a closed-loop network of "friends" and "followers" that presumably share similar beliefs and you are left with an echo chamber where thoughts, opinions, and judgments are left unchecked and unquestioned, which can create extreme bias.
In light of the above, the small but influential liberal community in Pakistan can continue to live in its echo chamber with a few English language newspapers and a couple of social media platforms, growing louder and not wiser.
This seems to corroborate the existence of echo chambers and homophilic relations among the Catalan MPs.
Karahalios, "Blogs are Echo Chambers: Blogs are Echo Chambers," in System Sciences.
Facebook itself came to that conclusion last year, when the company's data scientists found that echo chambers were born less of algorithmic bias than our own intolerance and illiberality.
So, in an odd way, I think the echo chamber nature of the Net may actually be hiding the similarities among us more than the differences.
But unlike the one-sided echo chambers of old, consumers can have their say too.
SCULPTURECENTER * May 9-July 25 * Curated by Fionn Meade * In her iconic 1976 essay "Video and Narcissism," Rosalind Krauss considers early works in the nascent medium (by artists such as Joan Jonas and Vito Acconci) as echo chambers that dissolve the notion of present tense.
Bloggers worked hard to create an air of inevitable victory, and many Democrats following them were floored by President Bush's reelection because they'd been lulled into complacency by the echo chamber. The lesson to many Democratic bloggers was simply not to participate in echo chambers.
Traffic to both sites is growing healthily, at the cost of dividing much of the political blogosphere into left-wing and right-wing echo chambers.